The VIPP Report: African American Bloodstock Agent Seeks Winner’s Circle at Kentucky Derby

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LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, Aug. 24, 2020 – The 146th running of the Kentucky Derby will be like none other.  There will be no fans in the stands at Churchill Downs, and for the first time in 13 years, African Americans will have ownership in a derby qualifying racehorse.

Ray Daniels, a Lexington businessman and Greg Harbut, a Lexington Bloodstock Agent are two of three owners of the Kentucky thoroughbred, Necker Island.  The two are among a tiny group of Black men to ever own a Derby qualifying racehorse.  “My family and I are excited and truly blessed to be part of such a momentous event,” Daniels said. 

Especially noteworthy of this historic accomplishment is Harbut’s lineage.  He is the grandson of Tom Harbut, a groom and subsequently the general manager for Harry F. Guggenheim’s breeding stallion operations in the 1960s.  Tom Harbut owned a racehorse, Touch Bar that ran in the 1962 Kentucky Derby.  He did not attend to watch his horse because Black’s were not allowed to sit in the grandstands.  Greg is the great-grandson of Will Harbut, the legendary groom for Man o’ War from 1930-1946.  Many industry experts consider Man o’ War to be the greatest racehorse of all time.  “My family has been on this journey for nearly 100 years.  Horseracing is in our blood and I am humbled and honored to continue the legacy of my grandfather and great-grandfather,” Harbut said.     

Many organizations are calling for a boycott of the Derby as a pathway to justice for the unarmed killing of Breonna Taylor at the hands of the Louisville Police Department.  “There is a powerful social movement sweeping the country that cannot be ignored,” said Daniels.  “Black lives matter, and I wholeheartedly stand in solidarity with the family of Breonna Taylor in the call for justice.” 

Necker Island is a colt by Hard Spun who finished second in the 2007 Kentucky Derby and amassed nearly $3 million in career earnings.  Necker Island will be ridden by Miguel Mena on Sept. 5th.

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!cid_A431B594D7B4419F8E91FA0D5F1A9765@SherlenePCVIPP Communications is a full service public relations, event management and production firm headquartered in Louisville, KY with clients and/or projects all over the U.S. We can create, maintain and sustain your brand.  Our clientele range from small businesses, non-profits, corporate leaders, entertainment to current and retired professional athletes.  Contact one of our team members to see if we can assist you at info at vippcommunications dot com.  www.vippcommunications.com

 

The VIPP Report: Celebrating the Legacy of Black Louisville with entertainment memories from the past

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(Louisville, KY) Music is healing to the soul and jazz is the essence of the heart and when you combine the two, you celebrate music and its legacy.  Legacies Unlimited Inc. presents Jazz At The Top Hat Club featuring the jazz renderings of saxophonist Rick DeBow and The Palm Room Crew on Friday, January 24th at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, (KCAAH) located at 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd formerly known as Old Walnut Street at 7:30pm.

Although members of the group CRISIS have not played as a unit for a number of years, they will come together as The Palm Room Crew for this Jazz At The Top Hat event.

We invite you to The Top Hat Club, it’s the place to be and to be seen as we celebrate the legacy of Black Louisville. Tickets are $35 for general admission.

On Saturday, January 25th, it’s “Ladies Night Out” with The Walnut Street Revue.  We take you back to the 1930’s, 40’s and 50s.  Louisville legends song stylist Tanita Gaines and showstopper Sheryl Rouse will perform.

Ken Clay, founder of Legacies Unlimited says “Its two evenings full of great music and memories.  We take you down memory lane as we remember our music legends from Louisville in particular Old Walnut with music powerhouses of today.  We will also honor an entertainer on that Saturday with the Helen Humes Jazz Legend Award.  We’ve only given the award to a handful of people over the years, but we feel the particular artist we will honor is so deserving.  We invite you both evenings as we party Old Walnut Street style.”

The award is named in honor of Helen Humes. A jazz and blues singer from Louisville, KY who was a vocalist with Count Basie’s band.  Enthusiasts and historians have documented that Humes was a vital voice in the swing-era.  Helping them shape and define the sound of vocal swing music.  The only child of a school teacher and her father was the first black attorney in the city.  In 1937, Basie asked Humes to join his band, replacing Billie Holiday. The Louisville music icon  recorded her last album in 1980 and died from cancer in 1981 at the age of 68 years old.

Tickets for The Walnut Street Revue are $50 for general admission and $60 for cabaret seating. (limited space)

Celebrating the Legacy of Black Louisville is presented by Legacies Unlimited in partnership with the KCAAH.  It is made possible through support from Christy Brown, the Owsley Brown II Family Foundation, Hardscuffle Inc., WLKY-TV and George & Mary Lee Fischer.

Tickets for the both JAZZ AT THE TOP HAT and WALNUT STREET REVUE are available at Better Days Records in Lyles Mall or at 1765 Bardstown Road. You can also purchase them online at redpintix.com.

Please announce and/or post our event to your entertainment/event calendar.  To set-up an interview, please contact VIPP Communications at  info@vippcommunications.com.

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The VIPP Report: KCAAH will host a grand re-introduction event featuring the first secretary the Smithsonian

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Special Report by Sherlene Shanklin, WHAS11 an ABC affiliate, Louisville

Louisville, KY,  When you think of re-introduction you think about how you are going to embrace change.  The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, (Heritage Center) will turn a page to history by starting a new chapter with the launch of their Inaugural Quarterly Membership event that they are calling “An Extraordinary Evening” honoring Dr. Lonnie G. Bunch III, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution on Wednesday, September 25th at the Heritage Center from 5:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

I’ve had several people ask me who is Dr. Bunch?  He’s the 14th Secretary of the Smithsonian and the first African American to hold the position.  He assumed the position on June 16, 2019 where he now oversees 19 museums, 21 libraries, the National Zoo, along with numerous research centers and several education units and centers.

His past position was the director of Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The re-introduction event will hold it’s first bourbon tasting west of 9th Street which will feature 12 top tier exclusive brands which they call the “Bourbon Alley”.  Woodford Reserve’s Master Taster Katie Farley will be sharing her craft with the guests. At this event, they will also honor the first African American master distiller on record Uncle Nearest.

Did you know that Brough Brothers Distillery has a micro-distillery in West Louisville?  They will also be apart of the event.

Dr. Neeli Bendapudi, President of UofL will serve as the emcee for the event as Mayor Greg Fischer, and other elected officials and dignitaries will be in attendance as guests enjoy a tour of new exhibits, cocktails, food pairings and of course networking opportunities.

For additional information visit the Heritage Center’s site at www.kcaah.org.

If you have a story idea, send it to me at The411@whas11.com.  You can follow me on social for the real-time news and announcements at Twitter @sherlenemediapr & FB @SherleneShanklin.

The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage is located at 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.

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Sherlene Shanklin: KCAAH welcomes Dr. Lonnie Bunch of the Smithsonian

The VIPP Report: KCAAH’s Grand Re-Introduction Event Featuring Dr. Lonnie Bunch

An Extraordinary Evening

KCAAH’s Grand Re-Introduction Event Featuring Dr. Lonnie Bunch

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Kentucky Center for African American Heritage

1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd, Louisville, KY

 LOUISVILLE, Ky. September 25 –The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage  (Heritage Center)  is embracing the change of season with a rebirth on Wednesday, September 25th from 5 – 8:30 pm. The evening will launch the Inaugural Quarterly Membership Event with “An Extraordinary Evening” honoring esteemed guest Dr. Lonnie Bunch, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution and Founding Director, National Museum of African American History.  In June 2019, Dr. Bunch assumed the helm as the 14th Secretary – and first African American – of the 19 museums of the Smithsonian Institution; its nine research centers, and the National Zoo.

The evening will begin with Louisville’s first bourbon tasting west of 9th Street, featuring 12 top tier, exclusive brands. Katie Farley, Woodford Reserve’s Master Taster will be sharing her craft in this “Bourbon Alley”. Sample Uncle Nearest, the small batch whiskey distilled to honor the first African American master distiller on record in the U.S, and Brough Brothers spirits crafted by our neighbors in the West End. These and other featured brands pay homage to the center’s drive for inclusivity.

Dr. Neeli Bendapudi will emcee our program of comments from Dr. Bunch and Aukram Burton, Heritage Center Executive Director, special presentations by elected officials, and a tour of Heritage Center new exhibits, cocktails, southern savory food pairings, and networking opportunities will all follow.

Doors will open at 5pm on September 25th at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage. Obtain entry with the purchase of a “Circle of Friends” membership to the Heritage Center for $125 per person.  In addition to admission to the Extraordinary Evening, membership benefits include admittance to three additional quarterly Heritage Center events; JB&B Holiday Celebration – Dec 2019; Miss Ida B. Wells – March 2020; Juneteenth Film Festival – June 2020.
Purchase online via Eventbrite link. Or call Kelly Dettor at 502 – 894 – 9768.

About Kentucky Center for African American Heritage
KCAAH is situated in the heart of the historic Russell Neighborhood, located in Louisville’s West End Corridor, an area undergoing revitalization and slated to become an arts and cultural district.
Located at 18th and Muhammad Ali Boulevard, the Heritage center occupies a 55,000 sq. foot campus and overlooks the area that once was Old Walnut Street. This area holds special significance for Kentuckiana’s African American community.
The Heritage Center is the result of a collection of African American educators, artists, and historians who have collaborated to give the long-dormant history of African American’s in their region the voice and platform it deserves.  This group evolved from the Louisville and Jefferson County African American Heritage Committee into its current mold, with a single unifying goal of promoting the Kentuckiana region’s black heritage.
The Center is a vital contemporary institution, providing space for performances of all types giving the rich heritage of African Americans the platform they deserve. The Center’s long-term goals include various spaces for career specific learning for students such as music, recording, trade industries and theater. 
1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., Louisville, KY  40203

www.kcaah.org

Sponsors for the Grand Re-Introduction event include:

Presenting Sponsor, Brown-Forman;

Platinum Sponsors, Humana; University of Louisville, Office of Research and Innovation

Reception Sponsor, Strothman and Company

Supporting Table Sponsors: AARP KY, ACTORS Theatre, HJI Supply Chain Solutions, Louisville Healthcare CEO Council, Louisville Tourism, Republic Bank, Signature HealthCARE, TOPS Magazine, York Management, Inc.

The VIPP Report makes its television debut on The LENS in Louisville

By Sherlene M. Shanklin

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My first segment for The Lens, a weekly program focusing  and celebrating urban lifestyle and their unique perspective on issues took place in the historic Smoketown neighborhood. It’s the oldest African-American neighborhood in Louisville, KY.

“Behind me you see the Ali gloves. Fun fact did you know they were made by Louisville native Ed Hamilton?  Now, this week’s The VIPP Report.”

20190628_131320Here’s some of the events I profiled in the inaugural show:

*It’s Bring It Live, The Dance Battle.  The show takes place on Monday, July 22nd at 7:30 p.m.

*The Juneteenth Jubilee at Waterfront Park had to be rescheduled due to rain.  So they moved it to Sunday, July 28th.  The new date signifies the adoption of the 14th amendment to the U-S constitution was certified.  The amendment granted citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States which included slaves.

*Boys 2 Men will be at the Indiana State Fair on Wednesday, August 14th.

*The Kentucky State Fair announces Sheila E and the GAP Experience on Friday, August 16th.  The concert is free with paid gate admission.  The KY State Fair runs August 15th through the 25th.

*The NAACP Hardin County Branch will host their 28th Annual Freedom Fund Banquet on Saturday, September 21st.  Their special guest speaker will be Roland Martin.

*It’s Wu-Tang Clan’s 36th Chambers 25th Anniversary Tour on Friday, October 18th at Paristown Hall on Brent Street.  Tickets are $115.  You can purchase them at kentuckycenter.org.

I’m excited to announce that i’m one of the producers of a new show.  I will also have the wonderful opportunity to present The VIPP Report.

If you have a story idea and/or if you would like to be a sponsor of the segment, contact The  VIPP Report by emailing  thevippreport@vippcommuications.com.

Follow our column at www.thevippreport.com.

Follow us on Twitter: @thevippreport

Follow us on IG: @vippcommunications/@sherlenemediapro

The VIPP Report: The first African American to reach the rank of colonel in the U.S. will be honored during a flag and plaque ceremony

A plaque ceremony and flag installation will be held the FIRST African American to hold the rank of “Colonel” in the U.S. Army and Buffalo Soldier from Kentucky

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The ceremony will be held at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage in West Louisville

 On Sunday, February 24, 2019, the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, (KCAAH) in partnership with The National Coalition of Black Veteran Organizations presents Colonel Charles Young the Epitome of Leadership.  As we near the end of Black History Month, we invite you to attend the installation of the 9th Calvary Regiment Flag and plaque ceremony for Colonel Charles Young.

Charles YCol. Young was born a slave in 1864 in Mason County, Kentucky.  He was one of the first African Americans to graduate from the United States Military Academy at West Point and the first black colonel in the U.S. Army.  He also served as a member of the 9th Calvary also known as the Buffalo Soldiers.  Young died in Liberia in 1922.

The ceremony will be from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at KCAAH which is located at 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.  During the program Brian Shellum, author of three books about the life of Colonel Charles Young will speak during the program.  His focus will be Col. Young’s challenging missions during his 30 years on active duty.  Also, a part of the ceremony will be Charles Blatcher III, chairman for the National Coalition of Black Veteran Organizations, (NCBVO).  His angle will be NCBVO advocacy on behalf of Colonel Young and his importance to Black Military History and Black History Month.

If you are unable to attend but would like to have photos of the event send your request to info@vippcommunications.com and we will give you a summary of the event and photos.

http://www.kcaah.org

twitter: @kygriot

VIPP Communications is a full-service public relations, event management and production firm headquartered in Louisville, KY with clients and/or projects all over the U.S. We can create, maintain and sustain your brand.  Our clientele range from small businesses, non-profits, corporate leaders, entertainment to current and retired professional athletes.  Contact one of our team members to see if we can assist you at info at vippcommunications dot com.  http://vippcommunications.com/

The VIPP Report: Kin Killin’ Kin Travelling Art Exhibition in Louisville at KCAAH

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(Louisville, KY) The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage is exhibiting James Pate’s KKK Series Kin Killin’ Kin Traveling Art Exhibition September 14 – November 12, 2018. The artist James Pate’s exhibit features scenes of young African-American men donned in Ku Klux Klan hoods committing acts of violence, creating an overt comparison between gang violence and the terrorism of the KKK. Pate says, “the numbers of Blacks killed by other Blacks since reconstruction far exceeds those lynched by “Whites”. Sadly, this pattern continued year after year, up to the present day”. The Center for Disease Control cites homicide as the leading cause of death for Black males between the age of 15 and 34.

Pate’s Kin Killin’ Kin is designed to shock and stop the viewer. Pate says “mainly, I want kids to pause and reflect”.

To close out the exhibition, a Youth Voices Against Violence Forum will held at the Heritage Center on Saturday, November 3, 2018, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. During this forum, District 15 Councilwoman Cheri Bryant Hamilton will facilitate a panel of youth from our community who will discuss the themes of gun violence and other forms of violence occurring in our society today. This panel of youth will examine the themes of gun violence within the context of public health, bystander action, healing through arts, and mobilizing for change through community dialogues.

Kin Killin’ Kin curator Willis Bing Davis says, “art holds the power to promote change”. For Davis, that’s partly because art is a language that everyone understands. “It is the universal connection of the art,” he said. “Art is one of the things that touches all of us.” Art is also a liberating language, he says. “Sometimes the art can say something that we can’t say in words.”

The Heritage Center views this exhibition as a powerful tool to promote community dialogue and community action by delving deeper into the themes of the exhibit, highlighting current efforts in violence prevention in Metro Louisville and cultivating the youth voice in the community. The Heritage Center recognizes the increase in gun violence and its impact on the communities it serves and presents Kin Killin’ Kin for the community to take action.

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The VIPP Report: KCAAH will break ground on a memorial named in honor of a Kentucky native and the first African American colonel in the U.S. Army

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You are invited to attend on Tuesday, July 31st at 10:00 am, the ceremonial ground breaking of the Veteran Flag Memorial Project at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, (KCAAH) located at 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.

The Charles Young Veterans Memorial is the first project of the Freedom Flag Initiative. It works through Public-Private Partnerships to install American Flags throughout communities and states across the nation, and build memorials to honor our nation’s veterans.

The memorial will be named in honor of Colonel Charles Young.  Col. Young was born a slave in 1864 in Mason County, Kentucky.  He was one of the first African Americans to graduate from the United States Military Academy at West Point and actually the very first black colonel in the U.S. Army.   He also served as a member of the 9th Calvary also known as the Buffalo Soldiers.  Young died in Liberia in 1922.

This project will officially announce the Veteran Flag Memorial Project created by the Region VI Commanders of the National Association for Black Veterans as an opportunity to unify people and communities by providing beautiful spaces to reflect on a symbol that can unify us all.  Some of the speakers participating in the program will be Scott Matheny, President, Semper Tek, Inc. Shedrick Jones, Sr., NABVETS Region VI Commander, Hosea Mitchell, COO, KCAAH, Daniel Ware, EOP Architects John Carman, CEO, CARMAN Landscape Architects.

The unveiling of the Charles Young Veterans Memorial will be held on Veterans Day, November 11, 2018 at KCAAH.

If you are unable to attend but would like to have photos of the event send your request to info@vippcommunications.com and we will give you a summary of the event and photos of the groundbreaking.

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The VIPP Report: Rev. Jesse Jackson is expected to attend Rev. C. Mackey Daniels funeral in Louisville

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Special Report by Sherlene Shanklin

(Louisville, KY) Later today, Rev. Dr. C. Mackey Daniels will be laid to rest after being sick for the last few months according to a family spokesman. He peacefully passed away on Mother’s Day, May 13th.

The pastor for more than 40 years of the West Chestnut Street Baptist Church leaves behind a daughter, four sons and three grandchildren. Rev. Daniels was the first black arbitrator to the courts of Jefferson County Kentucky Bar Association among many positions held throughout his life as a community and civil rights leader.

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I understand his good friend and fellow civil right activist, Rev. Jesse Jackson of the Rainbow Coalition will travel to Louisville to be apart of the service. I do know that Rev. Jackson was arrested Monday, (May 21, 2018) just two days before Daniels funeral on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.

Jackson said on his social media page after the arrest, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”- #DrMLKingJr.

So, I hope he’s able to get to Louisville in time for the funeral service.

Rev. Daniels’ funeral is at 11:00 am at the church followed by the burial at Cave Hill Cemetery. Rev. Dr. C. Mackey Daniels was 81.

Just days after his passing, 17th and Chestnut where the church is located was renamed Rev. C Mackey Daniels Way.

If you have a story idea, send it to me at thevippreport at VIPPCommunications.com. You can follow me on social, Twitter: @sherlenemediapr, @thevippreport & @vippcomm.

*Rev. Jackson was arrested in Washington, D.C. for protesting the #poorpeoplescampaign.   Jackson along with Rabbi @JonahPesner, @RevDrBarber,  & @liztheo refused to be removed in the US Capitol building.  Jackson said, together we will awaken our nation’s consciousness to the plight of the poor in our country! #PoorPeoplesCampaign 

https://t.co/uQXaKSBsBH. 

 

 

Louisville Sculptor Ed Hamilton’s African American Civil War Memorial is in this month’s Ebony

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The VIPP Report:  In the February edition of Ebony Magazine renowned sculptor Ed Hamilton has one of his pieces featured.  The African American Civil War Memorial began in 1992 as a Bill in Congress presented by Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton of the District of Columbia. Work began to develop the site and select an artist to design the commemorative art piece. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities commissioned The Spirit of Freedom designed by artist Ed Hamilton from Louisville, KY.  To learn more about Hamilton contact sshanklin@vippcommunications.com. 

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