The VIPP Report: Rap pioneer re-releases his 1988 album and will perform on Strahan & Sara with a Louisville native backing him up

 

By Sherlene Shanklin, The411 on WHAS11/ABC Louisville

Make sure you DVR Strahan and Sara on Wednesday, March 20th. Hip-hop pioneer Slick Rick will be on the show.  You know that I’m always looking for a connection to the Bluegrass state and of course you know I found one! When you see Slick Rick performing I want to draw your attention to the man on the turntables.  That’s Louisville native and Dwight “DJ Kaos” Chatman.  He’s been Rick’s DJ for many years.  Kaos has been all over the world with this legend of hip hop.

I have been in contact with ABC and they confirm the performance on the show.  I asked,  “is the artist releasing new music?”  He’s actually celebrating the re-release of his debut album The Great Adventures of Slick Rick some 30 years later.  The album was originally released on November 1, 1988.  Still known today as one of the best rap albums by Source Magazine.  In 2008, VH1 ranked the single “Children’s Story” a part of their 100 Greatest Songs of Hip Hop.

The album consisted of 12 songs, 49 minutes in length.  You may remember some of the songs on this album.  “Children’s Story”, “Teenage Love” and “Hey Young World”.   The album was produced by some of the biggest names in hip hop.  Jason Mizell better known as Jam Master Jay, Hank Shocklee, Ricky Walters and Rick Rubin.

So, tune in to see Slick Rick and DJ Kaos on Wednesday at 1:00 pm (EST) right here on WHAS11/ABC.  I’ve attached the promotional photo ABC and Slick Rick is using to promote the appearance.

If you have a story idea. send it to me at the411@whas11.com.  You can follow me on Twitter @Sherlenemediapr, IG: @sherlenemediapro and Facebook: SherleneShanklin.

 

The VIPP Report: Being nominated for Most Admired Woman by Today’s Woman Magazine

 

D1AeLZhWsAEWY3k

By Sherlene M. Shanklin

When I was contacted by Today’s Woman Magazine I had mixed emotions. – shocked to even be nominated even though no one knows anything about me.

People have no idea that I’ve worked in the media for almost 27 years.

When teachers told my graduating class that we would likely have to start at a smaller market to get your experience and then work your way back to your hometown.  I beat those odds and jumped straight to my hometown of Louisville.  I was hired part-time as an associate director. Working crazy hours, weekends and holidays.  All while I worked in a new healthcare division full time and attending graduate school obtaining two master’s degrees.

I’ve worked in just about every position behind the scenes.  Receiving several award nominations for floor directing and my camera work for some of the biggest news events in Louisville.  I had the opportunity to first produce/coordinate the very first forum where community leaders said some 20 years ago that Louisville was ready for a professional team.  Many of the same believers in that idea are still believing in the vision today and its moving in the right direction.  I believe there will be a farm team that’s affiliated with an NBA team who will make Louisville their home first. Those players, when developed, will be called up to team.

After proving I could produce I went from production to the newsroom where I had the opportunity to write and produce some of the biggest stories of our lifetime like 9-11. Then I was recruited away in 2003 to WHAS11.  I started off as a producer but later moved to the assignment desk.

I had an opportunity to start one of the first webcasts in the area about entertainment and community news that you did not see on the air.  I took the challenge upon myself to help promote people and events.  My original concept was to find national figures throughout the world that had Kentucky ties.  That helped me create that niche in the market and The411 with Sherlene Shanklin was born.

In 2018, the Society of Professional Journalists announced my story about the NBA as their Best Sports Writing piece of the Year.  I also won Best Use of Social Media for Louisville’s own Bryson Tiller announcing his national tour and pop-up concert series.  In 2017, I was nominated for an Emmy Award for the coverage of Muhammad Ali’s memorial coverage.

411After, first using web-based and social media platforms to promote my stories. I had the opportunity to go on air.  There was only a few stories out there at the time but now the table has turned and dozens of stories are developed with the emphasis on “did you know that person is from Kentucky?”

Now, you can watch The411 on Thursdays at 12:50 p.m., Fridays at 4:20 p.m. and Saturday mornings during Good Morning Kentuckiana Weekend.

You can hear me on 104.7/WLOU on Miss Krystal Goodner’s show on Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. and of course you can read my stories on www.whas11.com and www.thevippreport.com.

Can you believe it all started from an idea and now it has flourished into its own standalone brand.  My primary job at WHAS11, an ABC Affiliate is the assignment desk.  In a nutshell I’m reading and/or listening to all of the story ideas, news tips and helping develop the story.

Even if the story doesn’t make air I still try and assist as many people as I can with their problems.

So, no I’m not new to the area.  Some people consider me as the go-to in the community when they need assistance.  Even if I can’t assist, I try to lead then in the right direction to get assistance.  Once I think we can do the story.  I consult with the reporter I believe has the sources and passion to get the story done.

vippnewlogoWhile working around the clock in the media.  It gave me other opportunities to help people.  Once the demand was so real I started VIPP Communications.  It’s a one-stop public relations, branding, marketing, special events and video production firm.

Then The VIPP Report was created so I could have a platform to talk about clients.  Then through supply and demand everyone wanted to know where I vippstylemakeastatementpurchased my jewelry, so I created VIPP Style an online accessory store.

So, to be nominated as “Most Admired” by the magazine is simply humbling.  I’ve worked so hard for so long that I didn’t think anyone was noticing.  I’ve chosen not one but multiple fields that are highly competitive.  When no one wanted to help me, I created and developed what others would not give me a chance to do.  To now receiving calls for assistance simply brings me to tears.  This was not an overnight, an instant potato career. I’ve been moving mountains my entire adulthood and making ways out of no way.

I still have a lot more to accomplish because I’m never satisfied but to know others are watching and acknowledging that I’m on their radar lets me know that a real breakthrough is just around the corner.  This is a little bit about me and what I do.  I will be sharing more in the future about my journey, who I work with and why I refuse to lose.

If you have time between now and March 22nd at noon, please vote for me in the #media category for Today’s Woman Most Admired for WHAS11 Television.

www.todayswomannow.com/maw

 

 

trending_drk

The VIPP Report: Bumble, An International Social Media Platform to Honor #FirstMovers in Kentucky Through #BlackWomenBuilt Event

54255145_2138343006213717_2247319247967485952_n

On Saturday, March 16th, eight African American women from Kentucky will be honored by Bumble through Bumble Bizz and Freedom of Priss (FOP) at Flavour lounge at a private dinner. Dinner will be followed by a celebration open to the public that will start at 9 pm. These women are being celebrated for being business owners or leaders in their fields, which include fashion, media, marketing, psychology, science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Founders of Freedom of Priss, LaPrecious Brewer and Joelle Robinson want to acknowledge these business heroes and shed light on the impact that they have made in their communities. FOP will also use their unique stories to serve as empowering examples for younger minority women through a series of social media campaigns that will be ongoing.

Among the women being honored are Aryea Kolubah, fashion designer who recently had her gown featured on HBO and Vogue, Sherlene Shanklin, multimedia editor for WHAS11 and owner of VIPP Communications and Braea Tilford, former Miss Kentucky USA and founder of Grow Lead Inspire; a conference that enriches young women. Councilwoman Jessica Green will also be in attendance to honor these women for their myriad accomplishments. (Full list of honorees below.)

Bumble is a social app that lets women make the “first move” in dating, friendships and their careers. Bumble was founded by Whitney Wolfe Herd (co-founder of Tinder) to challenge the antiquated rules of dating. Now Bumble empowers users to connect with confidence whether dating, networking or meeting friends online. Bumble Bizz and Bumble BFF are components of Bumble.

The Freedom of Priss is a platform created by LaPrecious Brewer and Joelle Robinson that enriches and empowers women to be their most authentic and bold self, to achieve their ideal of success in relationships, careers and in the community.  For years, society has placed great emphasis on HIStory and there is no finer time than the present to invite women from diverse backgrounds to share her story.  This platform seeks to energize women to move into their purpose while gaining knowledge and insight from one another through personal discussions on the highs and lows of being our true selves and achieving our goals. FOP will begin hosting a series of events, printed materials and online content to foster a sisterhood of authentic women and help them to achieve their personal goals that they seek to meet.

  1. Aryea Kolubah – Founder of Aryea Kolubah & Co.
  2. Braea Tilford – Founder of Grow, Lead, Inspire and Miss KY USA 2018
  3. Chelsea Ellis – Owner of MAF Café and president of Jim Reynolds Asphalt.
  4. Faith Fountain – Ms. Ashland County (Kentucky United States Organization) and addiction/prevention educator
  5. Jade Spaulding – Ms. Downtown Louisville (Kentucky United States Organization) Home of the Innocents resident counselor and founder of the Home of the Innocents Pageant
  6. Nicole Dean – Life Coach, public speaker and founder of YMCA Woman Up Teen Outreach Program
  7. Samiyyah Sledge – Doctoral candidate at a prominent institution
  8. Sherlene Shanklin – Owner of VIPP Communications and multimedia editor for WHAS11

 

 

The VIPP Report: Louisville church surpasses the silver and gold anniversaries and now Mount Olive hits a historic number of 119 years

pexels-photo-208315.jpeg

Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church 

(Louisville, KY) There’s only been three pastors who’ve served at the helm of Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church.  On Sunday, February 24, 2019 the church will celebrate it’s 119th anniversary.

The anniversary will begin at 9:30 a.m. for Sunday School, followed by morning worship at 11:00 a.m. featuring the Anniversary Reunion Choir and Rev. Chris Hagan, pastor of Second Baptist Church of Owenton, Ky.

Dinner will be served. Following dinner, members and guests will return to the sanctuary at 3:00 p.m. for a special tribute for our retiring pastor Rev. Shanklin.

Shanklin, only the third pastor after 119 years has served 35 years as pastor and on Easter Sunday he will preach his last sermon at Mt. Olive.

The church along with our family life center is located on several acres on East Kentucky Street.

Please post and/or announce Mount Olive’s 119th Church Anniversary.  We also invite you to come worship and fellowship with us on Sunday, February 24th.

We will also update you closer to Easter Sunday plans for Rev. Alex Shanklin’s retirement.  If you would like to setup an interview with Rev. Shanklin and/or some of their members, please contact Sis. Barbara Leavell and/or Sherlene Shanklin at VIPP Communications by email at info@vippcommunications.com.

If you have a story idea, send it to thevippreport@vippcommunications.com.  Follow us on Twitter @thevippreport @vippcomm and Instagram @vippcommunications.

###

VIPP Communications is a full service public relations, event management and production firm headquartered in Louisville, KY with clients and/or projects all over the U.S. We can create, maintain and sustain your brand.  Our clientele range from small businesses, non-profits, corporate leaders, entertainment to current and retired professional athletes.  Contact one of our team members to see if we can assist you at info at vippcommunications dot com.  http://vippcommunications.com 

 

VIPP Special Report: How 10-year-old Seven Bridges death is now bringing awareness to so many who don’t understand the consequences that bullying brings

50518215_1471418022993635_236139599741583360_n

The heartbreak a community is feeling because a child dies a tragic death because he was suffering in silence

Special Report by Sherlene Shanklin, WHAS11 Television, ABC Affiliate in Louisville, KY (Original story posted: January 22, 2019/Updated: January 23, 2019)

Shanklin, an assignment editor with more than 25 years in the broadcast field for the station took the mother’s call in September 2018 while heading into work.  In a rare and raw account which is hardly done she reflects on when she took both calls about Seven Bridges.   

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The story of Seven Bridges is making headlines not only in Louisville but nationwide after the 10-year-old committed suicide on Saturday for alleged bullying. I have to use alleged because this will likely be determined in the court of law.

I spoke to the mother Tami Charles Saturday evening after returning from out of town. I had received numerous texts wanting to know what happened to Charles’ son. I had no idea because I was traveling and could not be distracted due to extremely heavy rain.

When I got back to Louisville, I reached out to her because I knew the backstory. I didn’t expect for her to answer my text message for weeks but later that evening she responded. We texted a couple of times and then my phone rang it was Charles. She told me what happened all we could do was cry together over the phone. I got off wondering, “What else could I have done?” “What can I do now?” “Why didn’t someone say something?”

50739415_1000508566810691_3647677009657593856_nTo hear the hurt but strength of a mother on the same day she lost her child made my heart drop into my stomach. What do you say? It’s not about getting the story. I didn’t move into this community. I grew up in this community. I know the names, the faces, the unsung heroes, and the sacrifices many do day in and day out and never get a day of media coverage. I chose to stay to help and support those who needed a voice but all I could do was listen to this mother.  What could I say to comfort a grieving mother who knew something was going on but couldn’t stop it?

I walked and cried and cried and walked, all night until my family had to ask if there was anything they could do. They know I keep my work close to the vest and private and I never include them to keep my journalistic integrity. Frankly, if I told them some things, they could not erase the image from their minds. Some stories develop while others do not, but I still assist and work for an answer with as many as I can even on my off days.

My main job is to get the story out of people. Whether they are yelling at me because of their situation, their frustration and/or confusion on how to express what they are thinking and/or feeling. My task is to translate their thoughts and get to the core of the situation.

A mentor taught me a long time ago that you need to listen to the details they are in there just listen. Then, ask follow up questions to make sure I’m understanding them correctly. If I can’t understand the story, I can’t get our team to understand the importance.

With this burden on my heart and mind, I did reach out to the reporter that helped with the story in September 2018. We talked about it. We agreed not to talk to Charles about doing an interview. There was no rush since we were the only ones who did the initial story on Seven. When she along with her husband were ready they would let us know.

Then when Charles mentioned that insurance would not pay for her son’s funeral we decided that we needed to do something. That’s when we asked them to do the interview.

Reporter Heather Fountaine and I also said we wanted her to talk to anyone who could help her get the needed funds to bury her only child. Actually, her miracle child because Charles thought she was not able to have children, but she was blessed to have Seven.

Because Seven’s death was a suicide we did not think she would get a lot of coverage. Fountaine and I had to move faster than any of us wanted too, but thinking we spoke to the family during the trying time we needed to see it through and worked all weekend on our days off.

Let me take you back to September 2018 when the mother was trying to help her child when no one else thought it was anything until the untimely death of Seven on Saturday, January 19, 2019.

Charles reached out to me in September and explained to me what her child was going through and as a mother she needed to find a way to help her son. They loved the school but felt like the process might have been broken when it came to the notification process.

What the mother didn’t know that I was having a bad day, running late for work and was literally stuck in traffic at 2:30 p.m. in the middle of the day. But when I saw Charles’ name on my caller ID I knew I needed to answer. She said she was having a problem and wanted to get the word out. I explained to her that I was in traffic and as soon as I got to work I would begin looking into it. As soon as we hung up, I went to work. I called my newsroom and asked them to pull the video, so we could review it as soon as I walked in and asked others to listen as well, so we could make a decision. (Our evening meetings are at 3:00 pm, so if i wanted them to try and get all of the elements before the end of business we didn’t have much time or I would have to hold the story for consideration the next day.)

In Charles’ video, which has 38,000 views and more than 1,100 shares. She expressed sincere concern for her child’s well-being. Charles alleged her son was choked and verbally abused racially and no action was taken nor was she told of the incident even though her child was elementary school age. She used the words bullied. She also said several times that they loved the school, but it needed to change its procedure of alerting parents when situations like this occur. I went into the meeting and explained the situation and that the mother wanted to address the procedure and the time frame in which a parent is notified so that the child does not continue to go through a situation alone but with a support team.

The Kentucky Dept of Education defines “bullying” as any unwanted verbal, physical, or social behavior among students that involves a real or perceived power imbalance and is repeated or has the potential to be repeated: 1. That occurs on school premises, on school-sponsored transportation, or at a school-sponsored event; or 2. That disrupts the education process.

This incident met the criteria. We sat down with Charles and her 10-year-old son Seven Bridges. The reporter was very sensitive to the situation but asked the hard questions and the mother and child answered freely.

When the team came back to the station, they were so surprised of the maturity of the fifth grader and his level of forgiveness.

In our September 2018 interview Bridges said, “I know that I can get it out of my mind, and tomorrow is like a better day, so I can still make friends with him.”

Charles also in that interview said she would like to see the school’s administration held accountable and more racial sensitivity training within the school system.

The school system said in September 2018 that the incident was under official investigation.

Presently, the district is opening a full investigation. The parents of Seven Bridges say they will file a lawsuit.

Now, the grieving parents have to find a way to bury their child. Again, they have insurance but when a person commits suicide it is not covered under the policy.  So, they have started a Go Fund Me page entitled: Rest in Paradise Seven Bridges if you would like to donate, go to https://www.gofundme.com/rest-in-paradise-seven-bridges.

The community is rallying around the family be using the words “Seven Strong” – this is to bring awareness of bullying of any kind so that no other family has to go through this traumatic situation because unfortunately Seven was suffering in silence.

There’s a phrase that’s commonly used: “If I can just save one person, then I did my job.”

I will never use that phrase again because the one person I thought I helped I could not save but I hope my efforts and Seven’s memory will not go in vain.

If you know someone who may not be able to talk to you. Have them talk to someone. Give them this number 800-273-8255. Let’s not let anyone suffer in silence.

If you have a story idea, send it to me at The411@whas11.com.

Sherlene Shanklin, an multi-Emmy nominated, two-time 2018 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Winner for Sports Writing & For Best Use of Social Media and multiple AP Awards currently works for WHAS11 Television. She created a segment The411 and is a regular contributor to whas11.com.  You can hear her on Thursdays at 11:30 am on WLOU/104.7FM as well as WHAS11 Noon Show at 12:50 pm, Fridays at 4:25 pm and Saturday mornings on Good Morning Kentuckiana at 6:25 am and 9:25 am.  You can also read her stories on this site The VIPP Report.  Sherlene’s podcast Giving You The Vibe, (GUTV) will begin in the first quarter of 2019.  

The VIPP Report: Louisville restaurant named top 12 breakfasts in the country

teamsuperchefs and roger mooking

The Cooking Channel’s Man’s Greatest Food will tackle who has the greatest breakfasts in the country.  Of course, a Louisville restaurant is on that list especially when you reference anything that mentions the “GREATEST”.  Can you guess who’s on that list?  Host Roger Mooking chose “Superchefs” owned by Darnell “Superchef” Ferguson located at 1702 Bardstown Road right in the heart of the Highlands.

Mooking visited chefs all across the U.S. and went into their kitchens to learn about their top dishes and some of the secrets behind it.  The show did visit Superchefs and they ranked the restaurant on their 12 greatest breakfasts list.  Mooking was looking for the best combinations of eggs, gravy, breakfast meat and fried dough.  You could put a check mark next to each one of those criteria when it comes to Superchefs Louisville.

Ferguson says “What a way to start the year by being placed in this prestigious ranking for breakfast.  I won the Thanksgiving challenge in November of last year.  It just gives me the confidence that the restaurant caters to any taste bud you may have.  Stop by and tryout some of the fantastic items we have on the menu.  This is really shaping up to be a great year for myself and Team Superchefs”.

Man’s Greatest Food will air on the Cooking Channel, Tuesday, January 15th at 7:00 pm (EST).

If you would like to setup an interview and/or check for availability for engagements, contact Sherlene Shanklin with VIPP Communications at sshanklin@vippcommunications.com

Here’s a link to a promo video: Cooking Channel’s Man’s Greatest Food

cookingchannel rogermooking

 

The VIPP Report: Celebrating the Legacy of Black Louisville and the influences that still resonate in the consciousness of the community

It’s a tradition that many automatically put on their calendars from year to year because when you attend the celebration hosted by Legacies Unlimited Inc. you walk away realizing that so many that grew up in this community made history in so many ways especially in the entertainment industry.  On January 25th & 26th, they will be remembered and celebrated for their outstanding accomplishments. It’s all about Celebrating the Legacy of Black LouisvilleIt will be held at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, (KCAAH) located at 1701 West Muhammad Ali Blvd.

This event pays tribute to the achievements and contributions that Louisville’s African American citizens have made to Louisville, the nation and the world.

The program will consist of exhibits, workshops and two performance events.  It’s the JAZZ AT THE TOP HAT. A re-imagined night out at the Top Hat Club, Black Louisville’s most famous entertainment spot during the glory days of the 1940’s and 50’s.  This event will present jazz vocalist, Bobby J and will feature International flutist and Jazz historian Galen Abdur Razzo.                                                                                        

 The second event is The Walnut Street Revue, a live stage show reminiscent of the “chitlin circuit” performances that played in venues on Walnut Street, now Muhammad Ali Blvd., in the 1940’s & 50’ when Walnut Street was in vogue.  The revue will be hosted by WLKY’s Ann Bowdan. The evening will be filled with great music presented The Jerry Tolson Jazz Group with vocalists Alisia and Karen Chavez.

A special tribute will be paid to the late Foree Wells, a Louisville musician who played with some of the greatest blues performers in the business, which included —music legend the late B.B. King.  Wells, also founded the Walnut Street Blues Band which included his two sons and a daughter in law. The Walnut Street Rhythm & Blues Band will be in attendance that evening and will perform a special tribute in memory of their beloved father, Foree Wells.

The Opening Ceremony will take place from 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm on Friday, January 25th followed by an unveiling of the exhibits.  The exhibits included in this year’s program include the following:   Two Centuries of Black Louisville …the Exhibit – A permanent exhibit of photographs from the book Two Centuries of Black Louisville —A Photographic History; Textile Designs by Louisville’s “Bag Lady” – Zephyr May Miller; and The Works of Louisville Folk Artist, Marvin Finn plus much more. 

There will be two workshops held on Saturday, January 26th.  The first one, The Legacy of Central High School from 10:00 am to 11:30 am. It’s an investigative look at the historical significance and impact that Central had on its students and the community as well. Come learn about the legacy that this educational institution created over the years through the lens of Dr. Larry Wilkins Doyle, a 1968 CHS graduate whose did his doctoral studies on the historic school.  The second workshop will be The Listening Room Workshop. It will present recordings of Louisville’s African American entertainers & musicians of the 50’s, 60’s & 70’s. These selections will be provided by the Soulful Sounds of Derbytown and presented by Ron Lewis of Mr. Wonderful Productions.

Celebrating the Legacy of Black Louisville is presented by Legacies Unlimited in partnership with the KCAAH and the University of Louisville Archives & Special Collections. It is made possible through support from the Owsley Brown II Family Foundation, WLKY-TV and George & Mary Lee Fischer.

Tickets for the both JAZZ AT THE TOP HAT and WALNUT STREET REVUE are available at Better Days Records in Lyles Mall or at 1765 Bardstown Road AND JAMBUSTERS BALLOONS & MORE at Popular Level Road. For ticket information call (502) 456-2394.

To set-up an interview, please contact Sherlene Shanklin with VIPP Communications at info at vippcommunications dot com.  If you have an entertainment/community calendar, we are requesting that you post and/or announce. 

###