The VIPP Report: Former President Barack Obama releases a statement on the passing of Rep. John Lewis

Sherlene Shanklin and President Barack Obama

By Sherlene Shanklin

Early this morning, former U.S. President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama released a statement on the passing of Rep. John Lewis.  He died on Friday, July 17th from pancreatic cancer at the age of 80.

Here’s an excerpt from the 44th President of the United States: “Not many of us get to live to see our own legacy play out in such a meaningful, remarkable way. John Lewis did. And thanks to him, we now all have our marching orders — to keep believing in the possibility of remaking this country we love until it lives up to its full promise.”

Obama also says “John Lewis — one of the original Freedom Riders, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the youngest speaker at the March on Washington, leader of the march from Selma to Montgomery, Member of Congress representing the people of Georgia for 33 years — not only assumed that responsibility, he made it his life’s work.  He loved this country so much that he risked his life and his blood so that it might live up to its promise.  And through the decades, he not only gave all of himself to the cause of freedom and justice, but inspired generations that followed to try to live up to his example.”

To read the full statement Barack and Michelle Obama statement

►Contact Sherlene Shanklin at sherleneshanklin@gmail.com or follow me on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram.

 

The VIPP Report: Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis dies at the age of 80

Official Congressional Photo

Rep. John Lewis

By Sherlene Shanklin

Late Friday evening, word spread quickly about the passing of Civil Rights icon and Congressman John Lewis.

The “conscious” of the U.S. Congress died from pancreatic cancer at the age of 80.

The Freedom Rider attended Fisk University and when he was not in class he was leading demonstrations and sit-ins.

Within the last two hours the following statements were released.

Former President Barack Obama says “When I was elected President of the United States, I hugged him on the inauguration stand before I was sworn in and told him I was only there because of the sacrifices he made. And through all those years, he never stopped providing wisdom and encouragement to me and Michelle and our family. We will miss him dearly.”

The Congressional Black Caucus says “The world has lost a legend; the civil rights movement has lost an icon, the City of Atlanta has lost one of its most fearless leaders, and the Congressional Black Caucus has lost our longest serving member. The Congressional Black Caucus is known as the Conscience of the Congress. John Lewis was known as the conscience of our caucus. A fighter for justice until the end, Mr. Lewis recently visited Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington DC. His mere presence encouraged a new generation of activist to “speak up and speak out” and get into “good trouble” to continue bending the arc toward justice and freedom.”

Bill and Hillary Clinton say “We have lost a giant.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi says “Today, America mourns the loss of one of the greatest heroes of American history: Congressman John Lewis, the Conscience of the Congress.

The Lewis family tried to hold the news of his passing because Dr. Martin Luther King’s lieutenant C.T. Vivian also of Atlanta, Georgia passed away earlier in the day.  Out of respect for the Vivian family they were trying to wait.

To learn more on Rep. John Lewis’ life and countless accomplishments go to https://johnlewis.house.gov/.

►Contact Sherlene Shanklin at sherleneshanklin@gmail.com or follow me on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram.

The VIPP Report: Arts Council of Louisville will celebrate Women’s History Month

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Sherlene Shanklin with WHAS11 Television and the owner of VIPP Communications (The VIPP Report, VIPP Style and Ivy Promotions) will be one of the guest speakers.

You are cordially invited the HISTORIC program celebrating Women’s History Month. Workshops of great interest and issues with local leaders discussing “Where do we go from here?” The topics are: JOBS; SOCIAL JUSTICE; ARTS EDUCATION; YOUTH LEADERSHIP; BUSINESS & ENTREPRENEURSHIP; BANKING & FINANCE; MEDIA; HEALTHY & WELLNESS.

KICKING OFF this exciting day of activities are arts presentations of “A Bus Ride with Mrs. Rosa Parks” and performers from Belize Dance Intermix.

At noon, there’s A MEMORIAL TRIBUTE TO THE LEGACY OF LOUISVILLE BLACK WOMEN & LUNCHEON opens with a traditional African Drum Call and dance with Harlina Churn Diallo. A tradition African Ceremony is done by as a Libation by Nana Akosua Bakeman Gyeaboa, LCSW, LCAD, CCTP, CNHP, ND in the Hotel Ballroom. Arts presented during the meal are “I AM ANGELA DAVIS” by Ayana Churn and a MIME by “Sunni.”

The distinguished Professor Dr. Joy Carew, Ph.D. of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville will be the keynote speaker.

RECOGNITION OF BLACK WOMEN: Ruth Bryant; Sarah Martin; Abby Fife; Mary Ann Fisher; Representative Mae-Street-Kidd; Harriett Porter; Dani Porter; Delores Baker; Anita Neil; Alderwoman Louise Reynolds; Zambia Nkrumah White; Alderwoman Lois Morris; Mary Alyce Sweeney; Senator Georgia Montgomery Davis Powers; Maude Brown Porter; Mildred Neal; Samiyra Shabazz; Judith E. Green; Juanita Burks; Dollye Cunningham; Zephra Mae Miller; Attorney Alberta Jones; Barbara Miller; Geneva Cooper Rich; Wilma Claybourne; Hilda Butler; Zephra Mae Miller; Mattie Coffield; Jewel K. McNari; Lucy Gantt Sheppard; Gladys Carter; Emma L. Minnis, Ida Louise King; Jimmy White; Milton Page; Lillian Cole-Singleton, Margaret Yeager, Lucille Madry; Anna L. Huddleston; Effie Mae Jewell, Georgia Eugene; Maude Benboe; Vera Dockery; Eleanor Hutchinson; Rebecca Shashu Tucker; Lillian D. Anthony; Grace James; Amy Hamilton; Rose Banks and to all our divine and benevolent African Ancestors who gave us the best of themselves. (A partial listing).

CLOSING PANEL DISCUSSION ~ Q & A with the community.

TOPIC -“WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?”
*ELECTED METRO LOUISVILLE COUNCILWOMEN & JCPS- Ms. Jessica Green; Dr. Barbara Shanklin; Ms. Mary Woolridge and Ms. Cheri Bryant Hamilton & Elected Jefferson County Public School Board Member Ms. Diane Porter.

ADJOURNMENT AFFIRMATION

MAKING MOVES: THE POWER OF BLACK WOMEN
EVENT DATE: Saturday = March ;18, 2017 – Open to the public
Place: Hotel Louisville,120 West Broadway, Louisville, KY 40202
Time: 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Doors open at 8:30 AM
Contact: Nana Yaa Asantewaa (502) 567-2787
Email: louisvillearts@aol.com
Presented by Arts Council of Louisville, Inc. – Disability Accessible

TICKETS – ONLINE – www.Eventbrite.com <community>
and can be purchased at BETTER DAYS WEST REC0RDS,
LYLES MALL 26TH & BROADWAY

The VIPP Report: Remembering Civil Rights leader Sen. Georgia Davis Powers

SenPowersSherleneShanklin
The worst feeling in the world to wake up to two dozen text and phone calls that a friend has died.  I drove past her home Friday and looked up.  My heart knew but mind won’t let it be.  I checked on Sen. Georgia Davis Powers on a regular basis.  Initially, some 40 years ago, I had no idea what her title or position was I just knew her as a neighbor on Cecil Avenue in West Louisville.  To hear that she died this morning my heart literally sunk.  I’ve been preparing myself for about a week to get the call but its never easy.  I even refused to write anything because I wanted to write it from the heart.
Georgia Davis Powers was born in Springfield, Kentucky on October 19, 1923.  One of nine children in which she was the only girl.  As a young girl the family moved to Louisville and eventually moved to the street that Cassius Clay known today as Muhammad Ali lived on, which was Grand Avenue.  She used to joke about babysitting Ali along with her brothers.  She would marry her first husband Norman Davis and adopt a son, William “Billy” Davis.  I know her second husband James Powers because that’s when we met.  Well, being four years old on a tricycle is actually how we met.  My job was to ride my bike from my parents house to Senator Power’s house and back.  I had the opportunity to speed up and down that five house distance to my pleasure without a care in the world.  While she was making history.
Who would of thought that 20 years later after college, I would talk to her and she referenced that I was the pretty little girl that had the two long ponytails that used her house as a marker to turn around and ride back down the street.  Back then everyone knew their neighbors and actually looked out for them.  She talked about my parents being the cute young couple that moved on the block.
I was so shocked when she said that.  I used to see her and her husband jump into a big beautiful car and I used to say “I want a car like that when I grow up.” Not knowing that her husband owned a car dealership and that in 1967 she was the first person of color and the first woman elected to the Kentucky State Senate.
Senator Powers worked actively for many years in the NAACP and that’s when she along with the president of the Louisville chapter gave me opportunities to work along side them and helped me perfect so many of the things I do today.  I’ve had countless chances to sit and listen to the senator.  When I started working for WHAS11 Television she would always say “If you ever need anything just call me” and I did.  We were together when the Western Branch Library celebrated their 100th birthday to the 2010 renaming of the Shawnee Expressway to the Georgia Davis Powers Expressway.  She used to call the newsroom and say “Sherlene I need for you to talk to your guys they just said the name of the expressway incorrect.” I would say yes ma’am and get it changed.  To many its something minor but for a woman that changed the climate of Kentucky politics it’s a major thing.
I would sit in the living room and talk about her 1964 March on the State Capitol in Frankfort.  She along with other leaders wanted to support equity in public accommodations.  Civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and baseball legend Jackie Robinson walked with Powers.
She was very open with me about her friendship with Dr. King.  She even told me that she was at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis when King was assassinated in 1968.
Powers retired from her seat in the Kentucky Senate in 1988 but her civil and human rights never stopped.  Just a few days ago she posted something on her social media page, yes, she had a page.
If you have a story idea, send it to me at sshanklin@whas11.com.  You can follow me on Twitter @Sherlenemediapr and Instagram at Sherlenemediapro.
The VIPP Report: Twitter @VIPPComm Email: TheVIPPReport at vippcommunications dot com.

 

The VIPP Report: Donna Brazile will speak at the NAMME conference in Louisville, KY

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Political strategist and author Donna Brazile would be in Louisville this Friday.  She will be the featured speaker at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the National Association of Medical Minority Educators Inc. (NAMME), hosted by the University of Louisville Sept. 16-20. The conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency Louisville, 311 S. 4th St.

Brazile will address the group at the Friday, Sept. 18, breakfast session beginning at 8 a.m. She will speak on “Health Care Reform and the Future Health Care Provider or Why Diversity Matters.”

She is known for making her rounds on the political talk shows circuit and a regular contributor to ABC News and CNN.

For additional information I’ve provided a link to their website http://nammenational.org/meetings-events/namme-2015/.

If you have a story idea, send it to Sherlene Shanklin at TheVIPPReport@vippcommunications.com.  You can follow me on Twitter @Sherlenemediapr @VIPPComm.