The VIPP Report: The first African American to reach the rank of colonel in the U.S. will be honored during a flag and plaque ceremony

A plaque ceremony and flag installation will be held the FIRST African American to hold the rank of “Colonel” in the U.S. Army and Buffalo Soldier from Kentucky

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The ceremony will be held at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage in West Louisville

 On Sunday, February 24, 2019, the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, (KCAAH) in partnership with The National Coalition of Black Veteran Organizations presents Colonel Charles Young the Epitome of Leadership.  As we near the end of Black History Month, we invite you to attend the installation of the 9th Calvary Regiment Flag and plaque ceremony for Colonel Charles Young.

Charles YCol. Young was born a slave in 1864 in Mason County, Kentucky.  He was one of the first African Americans to graduate from the United States Military Academy at West Point and the first black colonel in the U.S. Army.  He also served as a member of the 9th Calvary also known as the Buffalo Soldiers.  Young died in Liberia in 1922.

The ceremony will be from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at KCAAH which is located at 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.  During the program Brian Shellum, author of three books about the life of Colonel Charles Young will speak during the program.  His focus will be Col. Young’s challenging missions during his 30 years on active duty.  Also, a part of the ceremony will be Charles Blatcher III, chairman for the National Coalition of Black Veteran Organizations, (NCBVO).  His angle will be NCBVO advocacy on behalf of Colonel Young and his importance to Black Military History and Black History Month.

If you are unable to attend but would like to have photos of the event send your request to info@vippcommunications.com and we will give you a summary of the event and photos.

http://www.kcaah.org

twitter: @kygriot

VIPP Communications is a full-service public relations, event management and production firm headquartered in Louisville, KY with clients and/or projects all over the U.S. We can create, maintain and sustain your brand.  Our clientele range from small businesses, non-profits, corporate leaders, entertainment to current and retired professional athletes.  Contact one of our team members to see if we can assist you at info at vippcommunications dot com.  http://vippcommunications.com 

 

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The VIPP Report: Louisville church surpasses the silver and gold anniversaries and now Mount Olive hits a historic number of 119 years

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Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church 

(Louisville, KY) There’s only been three pastors who’ve served at the helm of Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church.  On Sunday, February 24, 2019 the church will celebrate it’s 119th anniversary.

The anniversary will begin at 9:30 a.m. for Sunday School, followed by morning worship at 11:00 a.m. featuring the Anniversary Reunion Choir and Rev. Chris Hagan, pastor of Second Baptist Church of Owenton, Ky.

Dinner will be served. Following dinner, members and guests will return to the sanctuary at 3:00 p.m. for a special tribute for our retiring pastor Rev. Shanklin.

Shanklin, only the third pastor after 119 years has served 35 years as pastor and on Easter Sunday he will preach his last sermon at Mt. Olive.

The church along with our family life center is located on several acres on East Kentucky Street.

Please post and/or announce Mount Olive’s 119th Church Anniversary.  We also invite you to come worship and fellowship with us on Sunday, February 24th.

We will also update you closer to Easter Sunday plans for Rev. Alex Shanklin’s retirement.  If you would like to setup an interview with Rev. Shanklin and/or some of their members, please contact Sis. Barbara Leavell and/or Sherlene Shanklin at VIPP Communications by email at info@vippcommunications.com.

If you have a story idea, send it to thevippreport@vippcommunications.com.  Follow us on Twitter @thevippreport @vippcomm and Instagram @vippcommunications.

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VIPP Communications is a full service public relations, event management and production firm headquartered in Louisville, KY with clients and/or projects all over the U.S. We can create, maintain and sustain your brand.  Our clientele range from small businesses, non-profits, corporate leaders, entertainment to current and retired professional athletes.  Contact one of our team members to see if we can assist you at info at vippcommunications dot com.  http://vippcommunications.com 

 

The VIPP Report: Wilson, LaBelle & Debarge scheduled to perform at the KFC Yum! Center

aneveningofsoul

By Sherlene Shanklin

Spring into love with an Evening of Soul with R & B superstars Charlie Wilson and Patti LaBelle along with special guest El DeBarge.

The trio will perform at the KFC Yum! Center on Saturday, April 6th. Doors open at 6:00 pm and the concert will begin at 7:00 pm.

The last time, I attended a concert of Wilson his stage performance was second to none. The high energy show moved with dancers and a band for over 50 minutes.

You would expect to pay a lot of money to see these artists are definitely getting a deal with it only costing you between $42 and $125 dollars.

Website: http://www.thevippreport.com  Twitter: @thevippreport @vippcomm

The VIPP Report: LCCC will raise the roof in a ceremony for a new theater

PREPARING AREA YOUTH TO BE THE GREATEST IN THE ARTS ARENA WITH A NEW THEATER ALONG THE MUHAMMAD ALI ARTS, CULTURE AND INNOVATION DISTRICT

LCCC

LCCC RAISES ROOF FOR GRAND LYRIC THEATER   

Louisville Central Community Centers, the developer of the Muhammad Ali Boulevard Arts, Culture and Innovation District, is constructing a performing arts facility to support its Kids Art Academy and the continued development of the district at its’ Old Walnut Street Development at 1300 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.

On Friday, February 15, 2019 at 10:00 am there will be a roof raising ceremony with key stakeholders in the community, LCCC and advocators to bring Muhammad Ali Blvd back to life will be in attendance to lend their support.  Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, Councilwoman Barbara Sexton Smith, an arts enthusiast, former Councilman David Tandy, Fund for the Arts’ CEO, Christen Boone, and representatives of the Norton Foundation and the Gheens Foundation all have confirmed their participation in the ceremony.  Representatives of the LCCC Kids Art Academy, the Tiny Tykes Theater Troupe and the Youth Repertory Theater Troupe of Louisville will perform to celebrate this achievement.

During the era between 1940-60’s, there was a theatre that was considered the hub where artists showcased their talents, which many went on to become professional entertainers performing alongside entertainment legends like Helen Hune, the jazz and blues singer with Count Basie’s band.  So, in 2019 we will revitalize the name The Grand Theater and Lyric Theater on historic Old Walnut Street in Louisville, KY in hopes of bringing life back into the arts and the community with a rich history in arts and entertainment.

The 300-seat Grand Lyric Theater will be home to LCCC’s Kids Art Academy (KAA), a youth arts education program with a focus on all facets of performing arts for over three decades.  KAA currently serves hundreds of school-age youth annually and has produced theater troupe sell-out productions of “Broadway-quality” musicals as “Beauty and The Beast”, “Black Nativity”, “A Christmas Carol”, “Once On This Island” and the nationally acclaimed show, “The Wiz.”. This state-of-the art facility will also serve as another venue for community groups to use for training, rehearsals and performances.

National experts from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) of Washington, DC endorsed LCCC’s economic revitalization vision by recommending to our community that Muhammad Ali Blvd. between 6th to 21st Streets be transformed into a cultural arts commercial district to help create a vibrant corridor that supports economic development and job creation west of Ninth Street.  This plan aligns itself with what used to be the historic Walnut Street (now known as Muhammad Ali Blvd.) between 6th to 15th Streets, an area once the commercial heart of the black community that contained thriving businesses, professional offices, restaurants and entertainment venues prior to the razing of the commercial district by an urban renewal plan in the 1960s. This plan has been included with support of Louisville Metro and Louisville Metro Housing Authority as an important part of the transformation of Russell.

Partial funding has been provided by U. S. Housing & Urban Development through its community development block grant to the city of Louisville and a number of private sources.  To complete the theater, additional sponsorship and naming opportunities are available to support:

  • lighting, sound and recording systems – $265,000
  • main stage, staging area and loading dock area – $140,000
  • rehearsal, restrooms and dressing rooms – $270,000
  • lobby, vestibule and restrooms – $250,000
  • seating, coat check and storage – $280,000

To setup an interview to discuss the Grand Lyric Theater and/or to setup a tour after the roof raising contact VIPP Communications at booking@vippcommunications.com.  We will see you on Friday, February 15th for the ceremony.  Please arrive at least 15 minutes in advance so you can be in position to get everything you need for your stories.

 Louisville Central Community Centers Inc. is celebrating its 70th year of service to residents of the Russell neighborhood and west Louisville community.  As an anchor institution, LCCC provides an array of services including early childhood education, youth development, workforce development training, small business and neighborhood development activities.

The VIPP Report: Preparing area youth to be the greatest in the arts arena

LCCC

A NEW THEATER ALONG THE MUHAMMAD ALI ARTS, CULTURE & INNOVATION DISTRICT
LCCC RAISES ROOF FOR GRAND LYRIC THEATER            

Louisville Central Community Centers, the developer of the Muhammad Ali Arts, Culture and Innovation District, is constructing a performing arts facility to support its Kids Art Academy and the continued development of the district at its’ Old Walnut Street Development at 1300 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.

On Friday, February 15, 2019 at 10:00 am there will be a roof raising ceremony with key stakeholders in the community, LCCC and advocators to bring Muhammad Ali Blvd back to life will be in attendance to lend their support.  Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, Councilwoman Barbara Sexton Smith, an arts enthusiast, former Councilman David Tandy, Fund for the Arts’ CEO, Christen Boone, and representatives of the Norton Foundation and the Gheens Foundation all have confirmed their participation in the ceremony.  Representatives of the LCCC Kids Art Academy, the Tiny Tykes Theater Troupe and the Youth Repertory Theater Troupe of Louisville will perform to celebrate this achievement.

During the era between 1940-60’s, there was a theatre that was considered the hub where artists showcased their talents, which many went on to become professional entertainers performing alongside entertainment legends.  So, in 2019 we will revitalize the name The Grand Theater and Lyric Theater on historic Old Walnut Street in Louisville, KY in hopes of bringing life back into the arts and the community with a rich history in arts and entertainment.

The Grand Lyric Theater will consist of 300 seats and will be home to LCCC’s Kids Art Academy, a youth arts education program with a focus on all facets of performing arts.  It currently serves hundreds of school-age youth annually and has produced theater troupe sell-out productions of “Broadway-quality” musicals as “Beauty and The Beast”, “Black Nativity”, “A Christmas Carol”, “Once On This Island” and the nationally acclaimed show, “The Wiz.”. This state-of-the art facility will also service as another venue that community groups will use the facility for training, rehearsals and performances.

National experts from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) of Washington, DC endorsed LCCC’s economic revitalization vision by recommending to our community that Muhammad Ali Blvd. between 6th to 21st Streets be transformed into a cultural arts commercial district to help create a vibrant corridor that supports economic development and job creation west of Ninth Street.  This plan aligns itself with what use to be the historic Walnut Street (now known as Muhammad Ali Blvd.) between 6th to 15th Streets, which was once the commercial heart of the black community that contained thriving businesses, professional offices, restaurants and entertainment venues prior to the razing of the commercial district by an urban renewal plan in the 1960s. This plan has been included with support of Louisville Metro and Louisville Metro Housing Authority as an important part of the transformation of Russell.

Partial funding has been provided by U. S. Housing & Urban Development through its community development block grant to the city of Louisville and a number of private sources.  To complete the theater, additional sponsors are needed to support:

  • lighting, sound and recording systems – $265,000
  • main stage, staging area and loading dock area – $140,000
  • rehearsal, restrooms and dressing rooms – $270,000
  • lobby, vestibule and restrooms – $250,000
  • seating, coat check and storage – $280,000

To setup an interview to discuss the Grand Lyric Theater and/or to setup a tour after the roof raising contact VIPP Communications at booking@vippcommunications.com.  We will see you on Friday, February 15th for the ceremony.  Please arrive at least 15 minutes in advance so you can be in position to get everything you need for your stories.

Louisville Central Community Centers Inc. is celebrating its 70th year of service to residents of the Russell neighborhood and west Louisville community.  As an anchor institution, It provides an array of services including early childhood education, youth development, workforce development training, small business and neighborhood development activities.

#CreateGrandThings

VIPP Special Report: How 10-year-old Seven Bridges death is now bringing awareness to so many who don’t understand the consequences that bullying brings

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The heartbreak a community is feeling because a child dies a tragic death because he was suffering in silence

Special Report by Sherlene Shanklin, WHAS11 Television, ABC Affiliate in Louisville, KY (Original story posted: January 22, 2019/Updated: January 23, 2019)

Shanklin, an assignment editor with more than 25 years in the broadcast field for the station took the mother’s call in September 2018 while heading into work.  In a rare and raw account which is hardly done she reflects on when she took both calls about Seven Bridges.   

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The story of Seven Bridges is making headlines not only in Louisville but nationwide after the 10-year-old committed suicide on Saturday for alleged bullying. I have to use alleged because this will likely be determined in the court of law.

I spoke to the mother Tami Charles Saturday evening after returning from out of town. I had received numerous texts wanting to know what happened to Charles’ son. I had no idea because I was traveling and could not be distracted due to extremely heavy rain.

When I got back to Louisville, I reached out to her because I knew the backstory. I didn’t expect for her to answer my text message for weeks but later that evening she responded. We texted a couple of times and then my phone rang it was Charles. She told me what happened all we could do was cry together over the phone. I got off wondering, “What else could I have done?” “What can I do now?” “Why didn’t someone say something?”

50739415_1000508566810691_3647677009657593856_nTo hear the hurt but strength of a mother on the same day she lost her child made my heart drop into my stomach. What do you say? It’s not about getting the story. I didn’t move into this community. I grew up in this community. I know the names, the faces, the unsung heroes, and the sacrifices many do day in and day out and never get a day of media coverage. I chose to stay to help and support those who needed a voice but all I could do was listen to this mother.  What could I say to comfort a grieving mother who knew something was going on but couldn’t stop it?

I walked and cried and cried and walked, all night until my family had to ask if there was anything they could do. They know I keep my work close to the vest and private and I never include them to keep my journalistic integrity. Frankly, if I told them some things, they could not erase the image from their minds. Some stories develop while others do not, but I still assist and work for an answer with as many as I can even on my off days.

My main job is to get the story out of people. Whether they are yelling at me because of their situation, their frustration and/or confusion on how to express what they are thinking and/or feeling. My task is to translate their thoughts and get to the core of the situation.

A mentor taught me a long time ago that you need to listen to the details they are in there just listen. Then, ask follow up questions to make sure I’m understanding them correctly. If I can’t understand the story, I can’t get our team to understand the importance.

With this burden on my heart and mind, I did reach out to the reporter that helped with the story in September 2018. We talked about it. We agreed not to talk to Charles about doing an interview. There was no rush since we were the only ones who did the initial story on Seven. When she along with her husband were ready they would let us know.

Then when Charles mentioned that insurance would not pay for her son’s funeral we decided that we needed to do something. That’s when we asked them to do the interview.

Reporter Heather Fountaine and I also said we wanted her to talk to anyone who could help her get the needed funds to bury her only child. Actually, her miracle child because Charles thought she was not able to have children, but she was blessed to have Seven.

Because Seven’s death was a suicide we did not think she would get a lot of coverage. Fountaine and I had to move faster than any of us wanted too, but thinking we spoke to the family during the trying time we needed to see it through and worked all weekend on our days off.

Let me take you back to September 2018 when the mother was trying to help her child when no one else thought it was anything until the untimely death of Seven on Saturday, January 19, 2019.

Charles reached out to me in September and explained to me what her child was going through and as a mother she needed to find a way to help her son. They loved the school but felt like the process might have been broken when it came to the notification process.

What the mother didn’t know that I was having a bad day, running late for work and was literally stuck in traffic at 2:30 p.m. in the middle of the day. But when I saw Charles’ name on my caller ID I knew I needed to answer. She said she was having a problem and wanted to get the word out. I explained to her that I was in traffic and as soon as I got to work I would begin looking into it. As soon as we hung up, I went to work. I called my newsroom and asked them to pull the video, so we could review it as soon as I walked in and asked others to listen as well, so we could make a decision. (Our evening meetings are at 3:00 pm, so if i wanted them to try and get all of the elements before the end of business we didn’t have much time or I would have to hold the story for consideration the next day.)

In Charles’ video, which has 38,000 views and more than 1,100 shares. She expressed sincere concern for her child’s well-being. Charles alleged her son was choked and verbally abused racially and no action was taken nor was she told of the incident even though her child was elementary school age. She used the words bullied. She also said several times that they loved the school, but it needed to change its procedure of alerting parents when situations like this occur. I went into the meeting and explained the situation and that the mother wanted to address the procedure and the time frame in which a parent is notified so that the child does not continue to go through a situation alone but with a support team.

The Kentucky Dept of Education defines “bullying” as any unwanted verbal, physical, or social behavior among students that involves a real or perceived power imbalance and is repeated or has the potential to be repeated: 1. That occurs on school premises, on school-sponsored transportation, or at a school-sponsored event; or 2. That disrupts the education process.

This incident met the criteria. We sat down with Charles and her 10-year-old son Seven Bridges. The reporter was very sensitive to the situation but asked the hard questions and the mother and child answered freely.

When the team came back to the station, they were so surprised of the maturity of the fifth grader and his level of forgiveness.

In our September 2018 interview Bridges said, “I know that I can get it out of my mind, and tomorrow is like a better day, so I can still make friends with him.”

Charles also in that interview said she would like to see the school’s administration held accountable and more racial sensitivity training within the school system.

The school system said in September 2018 that the incident was under official investigation.

Presently, the district is opening a full investigation. The parents of Seven Bridges say they will file a lawsuit.

Now, the grieving parents have to find a way to bury their child. Again, they have insurance but when a person commits suicide it is not covered under the policy.  So, they have started a Go Fund Me page entitled: Rest in Paradise Seven Bridges if you would like to donate, go to https://www.gofundme.com/rest-in-paradise-seven-bridges.

The community is rallying around the family be using the words “Seven Strong” – this is to bring awareness of bullying of any kind so that no other family has to go through this traumatic situation because unfortunately Seven was suffering in silence.

There’s a phrase that’s commonly used: “If I can just save one person, then I did my job.”

I will never use that phrase again because the one person I thought I helped I could not save but I hope my efforts and Seven’s memory will not go in vain.

If you know someone who may not be able to talk to you. Have them talk to someone. Give them this number 800-273-8255. Let’s not let anyone suffer in silence.

If you have a story idea, send it to me at The411@whas11.com.

Sherlene Shanklin, an multi-Emmy nominated, two-time 2018 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Winner for Sports Writing & For Best Use of Social Media and multiple AP Awards currently works for WHAS11 Television. She created a segment The411 and is a regular contributor to whas11.com.  You can hear her on Thursdays at 11:30 am on WLOU/104.7FM as well as WHAS11 Noon Show at 12:50 pm, Fridays at 4:25 pm and Saturday mornings on Good Morning Kentuckiana at 6:25 am and 9:25 am.  You can also read her stories on this site The VIPP Report.  Sherlene’s podcast Giving You The Vibe, (GUTV) will begin in the first quarter of 2019.  

The VIPP Report: Working out under the twin spires at Churchill Downs its Fab Fit Friday

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With Queen Teddy & area fitness experts as they show you their weight loss techniques

(Louisville, Ky) It’s time to kick your fitness into gear!  The Stamina Foundation presents Fab Fit Friday on Friday, January 25th at Churchill Downs from 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm.  Multiple fitness and wellness experts take you through a series of classes to assist with weight loss and/or to spice up your normal routine.  

 The queen of dance, Queen Teddy will travel to Louisville to do a 90-minute Dance Fitness Class.  One of her mottos is “If you believe you can, you WILL”.  Queen Teddy has been sharing her weight loss journey with 230 thousand followers on Instagram and now you get a chance to experience how she did it.  

 There will also be a mini fitness and wellness classes hosted by Nika from N-Spire Fitness, Savoy Fitness and Erin Quinlan from Ben & Zen Yoga and Snatched Fitness.  

 We invite you to come out and jumpstart your fitness routine in a supportive, motivational and inspirational atmosphere where we can help you stay and/or get fit and fab in 2019.  

 While you cool down and/or wait for your class to begin.  There will be vendors on site for you to support.  

img_39301(1)To be a part of Fab Fit Friday at Churchill Downs on Friday, January 25th tickets are $30.00.  To register, go to http://www.ashleydanderson.com/events. 

The event is made possible due to the generous supporter of Churchill Downs, Republic Bank, N-Spire Fitness, Savoy Fitness, Ben & Zen Yoga, Snatched Fitness, Queen Teddy and the Stamina Foundation.   

To setup an interview, please contact Sherlene Shanklin with VIPP Communications at info@vippcommunications.com.  We also request that you include our event on your community calendars and announcements.    

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