TheVIPPReport: A look at retired Capt. Carol Hickman’s career

When she signed up to be a Jefferson County Police officer, Carol Hickman said she wanted to make a difference. Hickman is a retired captain and was the first woman and African American officer to lead a district for the county. She said she started out as a clerk typist. 

“The police department didn’t have any women, and in 1972 I went to school and became an officer,” she explained. Hickman climbed the ranks from sergeant to lieutenant to captain. Because of her rising within the ranks, she said someone told her no one would listen to her because she’s a woman.

“I thanked him, and ironically, the chief, he retired then came back as interim chief. When he came back, he was the person I made major,” she said.

She said within Jefferson County Police, the chief appoints majors within the department. Whenever a new chief is selected, they have the option to change who has the major rank. It is not a demotion she said, only a change in title.

Hickman talked about the difficulties working in a predominantly male profession.

She said, “I can’t say so much of being a woman of color as being a woman. We would go out on cases and people would ask us to go to the back door but when the white officers came they would go through the front door. I didn’t particularly like it but it was a job I had to do and I did it.”

Then one day, Hickman said she had enough and walked through the front door.

She recalled reminding the person they had called them for help. The homeowner allegedly wasn’t happy and called Hickman’s district to complain.

All these years, Hickman said she never forgot the incident and so many others.

Hickman’s first case was the Valley Drive-Ins.

“I was working in missing persons. We got the reports of the soldier and young lady that was missing from the ticket booth at the Valley Drive-In,” she said.

She explained the department were getting leads, but it was pushing them to a second possible case.

“The person who abducted the first people also had abducted this young lady,” Hickman said. “Well, I got the young lady back.”

Another case that stood out to Hickman was Danny Tetrick’s. As of right now, he’s still serving a life sentence at the Kentucky State Penitentiary.

She said in her free time she coached little league baseball for both boys and girls. She also volunteered for Black Achievers for many years and served as a liaison for community and police relations.

She has one son and her late husband, Charles Hickman, was with the Louisville Metro Police Department.

Click the link to see the story: https://www.whas11.com/article/news/community/moments-that-matter/louisville-kentucky-police-captain-first-african-american-officer/417-9e8d013b-c980-4916-9283-d9808bcac8c4

Contact Sherlene Shanklin at sherlene@sherleneshanklin.com or follow me on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram.

The VIPP Report: Owner of Superchefs challenges community to feed a JCPS student

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CHEF DARNELL FERGUSON TAKING ON THE FOOD CHALLENGE ONE CITY AT A TIME

Darnell Superchef Ferguson(Louisville, KY) Darnell “Superchef” Ferguson learned that hunger doesn’t take a day off.  He had the opportunity to talk to the team of “Blessings in a Backpack” and they shared with him the staggering number of elementary children that need assistance when it comes to food, particularly on weekends within Jefferson County.

They serve 4,700 children at 43 schools in the Louisville Metro Area.  That’s impressive but that’s only 7% of the 64,000 who qualify.

Superchef is ready to take on the challenge and he will be calling on the community to help.  It takes approximately $100 to feed one child during a 38-week school year which does not include the summer break.

Darnell says “Can you imagine sitting at home on the weekend and not having enough food and you are counting down the time until you can get breakfast on Monday morning?  It’s hard and sad to imagine.  I know we as a community can make a difference in the lives of these children and I’m willing to lead the way.  We are not going to have a start date because these children needed food yesterday.”

To setup an interview with Darnell “Super Chef” Ferguson or if you would like to know how you can help with his challenge to help us feed one school at time, please contact us at please contact VIPP Communications at 502-295-0435 or by email at info@vippcommunications.com.

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Super Chefs located at 1702 Bardstown Road.  To reserve your lunch delivery service, you can call 502-409-8103 or by going to www.eatsuperchefs.com/.

VIPP Communications is a full service public relations, event management and production firm headquartered in Louisville, KY with clients and/or projects all over the U.S. We can create, maintain and sustain your brand.  Our clientele range from small businesses, non-profits, corporate leaders, entertainment to current and retired professional athletes.  Contact one of our team members to see if we can assist you at info at vippcommunications dot com.