Birdie Maxwell named a Muhammad Ali Scholar and first student-athlete in the prestigious program

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Birdie Maxwell Photo Courtesy Sherlene Shanklin

By Sherlene Shanklin, WHAS11 ABC Louisville

They call her ‘birdie’ because her mother called her an early bird. Now, the Louisville Cardinal will take a month overseas exploring social justice issues as part of a prestigious program. The University of Louisville rower Kyelia ‘Birdie’ Maxwell talks about being named a Muhammad Ali Scholar. 

Birdie says she was absolutely amazed I was even selected as a student athlete but as a student in the university to be part of such an important program and such an important part of UofL’s history, of Louisville’s history, the home of Muhammad Ali I felt honored that they would allow me to be apart of the program with a bunch of other amazing students. 

The UofL rower is the first student-athlete to be named a Muhammad Ali Scholar since its inception six years ago.  Birdie says “I honestly didn’t think it was that big until everyone was texting me, emailing me saying congratulations its such an honor.”

The Biology and fine arts major grew up in Clarksville, TN. Both of her parents served in the military giving her an opportunity to see the world.  She says “my mom was in the air force for five years and then my dad was in the army for 32 years. I’ve lived in Germany, Korea, I went on vacation well I guess you wont call a vacation it was more of a senior trip to Spain, London, France, stayed in Austria and I stayed in Peru as well.”

Birdie had several options to attend college but knew UofL was the right fit.  “When I came on this campus-I just fell in love with the campus automatically and plus I was introduced to rowing” says Maxwell.  

I asked her with social unrest in the city and around the world. Birdie says she wants to be a part of change.  She goes on to say that she even participating in the campus protest lead by the men’s basketball team. 
“I think with all the injustice that’s happening in Louisville and especially in Minneapolis with George Floyd and Breonna Taylor it really feels close to home with Breonna Taylor being that I want to go into medicine. Im a Black woman and I live in Louisville. I think I have some type of personal connection where I thought it could have been me!

If Birdie had the opportunity… she’d like to help change laws. She remains positive while keeping her eye on the prize just like Muhammad Ali both with the mentality of wanting to shake up and change the world . 

She says “I would like to become a doctor and be that face of change for young black students, brown students, people in poverty, underprivileged children to look up to me and say I can do that.”

Birdie recently had hip surgery but we hope to see here on the water soon. As for her role as a Muhammad Ali Scholar she will take about a month oversees to explore justice issues in a different cultural, political, social, and economic context. Here’s the 2021  Ali Scholars: Lorenzo Rowan, Shradda Patel, Taylor Griffith, Edison Pleasants, Maegan Heller, Ashley Aguilera-Rico, Pamambuna Touray, Kaylee Boyd and Kyelia Maxwell. 

Sherlene & Birdie Maxwell

Contact Sherlene Shanklin at sherlene@sherleneshanklin.com or follow me on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram.

To see story click the link -> https://www.whas11.com/article/features/kyelia-birdie-maxwell-muhammad-ali-scholar/417-4f3f9af8-b936-456d-a30b-1d1186660917

The VIPP Report: Miss USA Deshauna Barber will be in Louisville to speak at Black Achievers Celebration

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By Sherlene M. Shanklin

With scholarship as their main objective, the Chestnut Street Family YMCA Black Achievers program announces their keynote speaker for their 41st celebration.

Miss USA 2016 DeShauna Barber will be the keynote speaker.  The U.S. Army Reserve Captain will motivate young aspiring leaders to stay disciplined as they follow their dreams even when there’s a hardship not to stop trying to reach their goals.

Youth Achiever of the Year is Tajalia Tillman who attends DuPont Manual High School.

The 41st YMCA Black Achievers Celebration will be held on Saturday, February 22nd at the Galt House Hotel at 5:30pm.  Tickets are $100 per person and they can be purchases and the Chestnut Street YMCA or by emailing ljohnson@ymcalouisville.org.

The YMCA Black Achievers Program includes events such as Spring Break College Tours, Community Service Projects, Leadership training, ACT workshops, college & career fairs plus much more.

I have the great honor of announcing the scholarships and institutions they plan to attend.  For many families, this will be the first time they will hear the school and the amount of scholarship money their child will receive.  It’s truly an exciting moment and I have to say that when I received the long list of names and the amount of money they will get in scholarships it’s super impressive and I can only imagine what their families will feel on Saturday.

Congratulations to the scholars of the Chestnut Street Family YMCA Black Achievers.  Our future is in great hands with your leadership.

The VIPP Report: Who will be the next Miss Kentucky and Miss Kentucky Outstanding Teen?

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WHO WILL REPRESENT THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY IN THE MISS AMERICA AND MISS AMERICA’S OUTSTANDING TEEN COMPETITION FOR 2019?

Witness the crowning of two young ladies in Louisville at the Historic Brown Theatre

(Louisville, KY) Tickets are now on sale for the Miss Kentucky and Miss Kentucky’s Outstanding Teen competitions being held at the Brown Theatre, 315 W. Broadway June 5th-8th in downtown Louisville, Kentucky.

This is the official state preliminaries of the Miss America and Miss America’s Outstanding Teen Scholarship Organization.

These programs empower young women across Kentucky through pageantry to develop the leadership skills and confidence to achieve their biggest goals in life.  The Miss Kentucky Scholarship Organization continues to develop role models for communities not only in Kentucky but the world.

Dr. Ashley D. Anderson, Executive Director for the pageant and President of the Miss Kentucky board says “We had two outstanding representatives this past year.  Our talented candidates will have some big shoes to fill, but I’m confident that our judges will find two deserving young ladies.  As soon as they are crowned they will immediately begin to prepare for the national stage.  Kentucky will be a major contender and we are always proud of how hard these ladies work as they represent their families, community and the Bluegrass state.  I hope you come out and support them because they are all so talented.”

Awarding over $70,000 in cash scholarships and over $2 million in inkind scholarships, the Miss Kentucky Scholarship Organization is a celebration of the talent, scholastic achievement and commitment to service of Kentucky’s finest young women. This Organization is so much more than a crown…it is changing Kentucky, one young woman at a time!

Tickets are $30.00 for events June 5th-7th.  The June 8th final event is $50.00.  If you would like to attend all four events its $130.00 per person.  You can purchase them by calling 800-775-7777 or 502-584-7777.  You can also purchase them at the Kentucky Center box office.

To set up an interview, please contact Sherlene Shanklin, at sshanklin@vippcommunications.com.

For additional information on the pageant please visit www.misskentucky.org.

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VIPP Special Report: How 10-year-old Seven Bridges death is now bringing awareness to so many who don’t understand the consequences that bullying brings

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The heartbreak a community is feeling because a child dies a tragic death because he was suffering in silence

Special Report by Sherlene Shanklin, WHAS11 Television, ABC Affiliate in Louisville, KY (Original story posted: January 22, 2019/Updated: January 23, 2019)

Shanklin, an assignment editor with more than 25 years in the broadcast field for the station took the mother’s call in September 2018 while heading into work.  In a rare and raw account which is hardly done she reflects on when she took both calls about Seven Bridges.   

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The story of Seven Bridges is making headlines not only in Louisville but nationwide after the 10-year-old committed suicide on Saturday for alleged bullying. I have to use alleged because this will likely be determined in the court of law.

I spoke to the mother Tami Charles Saturday evening after returning from out of town. I had received numerous texts wanting to know what happened to Charles’ son. I had no idea because I was traveling and could not be distracted due to extremely heavy rain.

When I got back to Louisville, I reached out to her because I knew the backstory. I didn’t expect for her to answer my text message for weeks but later that evening she responded. We texted a couple of times and then my phone rang it was Charles. She told me what happened all we could do was cry together over the phone. I got off wondering, “What else could I have done?” “What can I do now?” “Why didn’t someone say something?”

50739415_1000508566810691_3647677009657593856_nTo hear the hurt but strength of a mother on the same day she lost her child made my heart drop into my stomach. What do you say? It’s not about getting the story. I didn’t move into this community. I grew up in this community. I know the names, the faces, the unsung heroes, and the sacrifices many do day in and day out and never get a day of media coverage. I chose to stay to help and support those who needed a voice but all I could do was listen to this mother.  What could I say to comfort a grieving mother who knew something was going on but couldn’t stop it?

I walked and cried and cried and walked, all night until my family had to ask if there was anything they could do. They know I keep my work close to the vest and private and I never include them to keep my journalistic integrity. Frankly, if I told them some things, they could not erase the image from their minds. Some stories develop while others do not, but I still assist and work for an answer with as many as I can even on my off days.

My main job is to get the story out of people. Whether they are yelling at me because of their situation, their frustration and/or confusion on how to express what they are thinking and/or feeling. My task is to translate their thoughts and get to the core of the situation.

A mentor taught me a long time ago that you need to listen to the details they are in there just listen. Then, ask follow up questions to make sure I’m understanding them correctly. If I can’t understand the story, I can’t get our team to understand the importance.

With this burden on my heart and mind, I did reach out to the reporter that helped with the story in September 2018. We talked about it. We agreed not to talk to Charles about doing an interview. There was no rush since we were the only ones who did the initial story on Seven. When she along with her husband were ready they would let us know.

Then when Charles mentioned that insurance would not pay for her son’s funeral we decided that we needed to do something. That’s when we asked them to do the interview.

Reporter Heather Fountaine and I also said we wanted her to talk to anyone who could help her get the needed funds to bury her only child. Actually, her miracle child because Charles thought she was not able to have children, but she was blessed to have Seven.

Because Seven’s death was a suicide we did not think she would get a lot of coverage. Fountaine and I had to move faster than any of us wanted too, but thinking we spoke to the family during the trying time we needed to see it through and worked all weekend on our days off.

Let me take you back to September 2018 when the mother was trying to help her child when no one else thought it was anything until the untimely death of Seven on Saturday, January 19, 2019.

Charles reached out to me in September and explained to me what her child was going through and as a mother she needed to find a way to help her son. They loved the school but felt like the process might have been broken when it came to the notification process.

What the mother didn’t know that I was having a bad day, running late for work and was literally stuck in traffic at 2:30 p.m. in the middle of the day. But when I saw Charles’ name on my caller ID I knew I needed to answer. She said she was having a problem and wanted to get the word out. I explained to her that I was in traffic and as soon as I got to work I would begin looking into it. As soon as we hung up, I went to work. I called my newsroom and asked them to pull the video, so we could review it as soon as I walked in and asked others to listen as well, so we could make a decision. (Our evening meetings are at 3:00 pm, so if i wanted them to try and get all of the elements before the end of business we didn’t have much time or I would have to hold the story for consideration the next day.)

In Charles’ video, which has 38,000 views and more than 1,100 shares. She expressed sincere concern for her child’s well-being. Charles alleged her son was choked and verbally abused racially and no action was taken nor was she told of the incident even though her child was elementary school age. She used the words bullied. She also said several times that they loved the school, but it needed to change its procedure of alerting parents when situations like this occur. I went into the meeting and explained the situation and that the mother wanted to address the procedure and the time frame in which a parent is notified so that the child does not continue to go through a situation alone but with a support team.

The Kentucky Dept of Education defines “bullying” as any unwanted verbal, physical, or social behavior among students that involves a real or perceived power imbalance and is repeated or has the potential to be repeated: 1. That occurs on school premises, on school-sponsored transportation, or at a school-sponsored event; or 2. That disrupts the education process.

This incident met the criteria. We sat down with Charles and her 10-year-old son Seven Bridges. The reporter was very sensitive to the situation but asked the hard questions and the mother and child answered freely.

When the team came back to the station, they were so surprised of the maturity of the fifth grader and his level of forgiveness.

In our September 2018 interview Bridges said, “I know that I can get it out of my mind, and tomorrow is like a better day, so I can still make friends with him.”

Charles also in that interview said she would like to see the school’s administration held accountable and more racial sensitivity training within the school system.

The school system said in September 2018 that the incident was under official investigation.

Presently, the district is opening a full investigation. The parents of Seven Bridges say they will file a lawsuit.

Now, the grieving parents have to find a way to bury their child. Again, they have insurance but when a person commits suicide it is not covered under the policy.  So, they have started a Go Fund Me page entitled: Rest in Paradise Seven Bridges if you would like to donate, go to https://www.gofundme.com/rest-in-paradise-seven-bridges.

The community is rallying around the family be using the words “Seven Strong” – this is to bring awareness of bullying of any kind so that no other family has to go through this traumatic situation because unfortunately Seven was suffering in silence.

There’s a phrase that’s commonly used: “If I can just save one person, then I did my job.”

I will never use that phrase again because the one person I thought I helped I could not save but I hope my efforts and Seven’s memory will not go in vain.

If you know someone who may not be able to talk to you. Have them talk to someone. Give them this number 800-273-8255. Let’s not let anyone suffer in silence.

If you have a story idea, send it to me at The411@whas11.com.

Sherlene Shanklin, an multi-Emmy nominated, two-time 2018 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Winner for Sports Writing & For Best Use of Social Media and multiple AP Awards currently works for WHAS11 Television. She created a segment The411 and is a regular contributor to whas11.com.  You can hear her on Thursdays at 11:30 am on WLOU/104.7FM as well as WHAS11 Noon Show at 12:50 pm, Fridays at 4:25 pm and Saturday mornings on Good Morning Kentuckiana at 6:25 am and 9:25 am.  You can also read her stories on this site The VIPP Report.  Sherlene’s podcast Giving You The Vibe, (GUTV) will begin in the first quarter of 2019.  

The VIPP Report: Dance company Dorrance Dance performs in Louisville

Kentucky Center announce Dorrance Dance as part of their Brown-Forman Midnite Ramble Series. Photo sent as promotion with release.

As part of the Brown-Forman Midnite Ramble its Dorrance Dance.  They will be at the Brown Theatre on Wednesday, January 23rd

Tickets start at $20.00.  the dance company honors tap dance and its compelling content.

You can purchase tickets at the Kentucky Center box office, Kentuckycenter.org or by calling 502-584-7777. 

If you have a story idea, send it to thevippreport@vippcommunications.com. Follow us on Twitter @thevippreport & @vippcomm.

The VIPP Report: Jazz artists begin to arrive in Louisville to pay tribute to Lionel Hampton for his contributions in music

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LOUISVILLE, KY – The Lincoln Foundation in partnership with Dick Sisto, Ken Clay, Owsley Brown III, Louisville Public Media, Owsley Brown II Family Foundation, The Kentucky Center, Mike Balter Mallets and Vandoren Saxophone Reeds proudly announces the inaugural Lionel Hampton Tribute Concert Showcase. The event will take place in the Bomhard Theater of the Kentucky Center on Saturday October 7th at 7:30 p.m.  The concert will be a live-recording.

 Dick Sisto, on vibraphone, is the artistic and music director who will lead a group of featured jazz artists who will pay tribute to jazz greats past and present.  They include Barry Ries, trumpet; Bobby Broom, guitar; Bobby Floyd, keyboards; Jim Anderson, bass; Art Gore, drums and special guest Harry Skoler, clarinet (Berklee College of Music). These experienced artists have played with jazz greats such as Lionel Hampton, Sonny Rollins, Count Basie, Benny Golson, and George Benson.

            Louisville native Lionel Hampton was born on April 20, 1908. He popularized the vibraphone and played with the Benny Goodman Quartet before becoming a successful bandleader. Hampton received honors from Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton. He performed well into his 90s before passing away in 2002.

           Mayor Greg Fischer and the city of Louisville have embraced this event and hope to honor this hometown jazz great and innovator with an official Lionel Hampton dedication day. The event will also feature a showcase of young percussion students on the vibraphone and drums.  A music scholarship will be considered for one of the participating youth.

           Tickets start at $30.00 and they are still available at the Kentucky Center Box Office.  Proceeds from the event will benefit Lincoln Foundation’s signature Whitney M. YOUNG Scholars Program®.  During the concert, a representative from Toyota Motor Manufacturing of Kentucky will make a special announcement that will impact the youth in the scholars program.

           Lincoln Foundation has empowered disadvantaged youth to overcome adversity through education since its inception by Berea College over 100 years ago. The mission of the organization is to provide educational enrichment programs that develop and support youth in overcoming barriers to achievement. Lincoln Foundation outcomes demonstrate that students can break the cycle of poverty in their families through higher education. Students are holistically developed in an educational culture that stresses academic achievement and graduation from college.  Lincoln Foundation annually serves approximately 600 students from two years of age through college with its year-round, nontraditional educational enrichment programs.

For additional information, please contact Paula Campbell at 502.585.4733 ext. 203 or Sherlene Shanklin at sshanklin@vippcommunications.com or visit our website at www.lincolnfdn.org.

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The VIPP Report: The Lincoln Foundation announces Evening of Jazz entertainment

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Ansyn Banks Quintet will PERFORM tribute to jazz great Kenny Dorham at

 ANNUAL EVENING OF JAZZ

(Louisville, KY).  The 22nd Annual Evening of Jazz featuring the Ansyn Banks Quintet will be held on Friday, August 18, 2017 at the KCD Theater, 4100 Springdale Road. Proceeds from the event benefit the Whitney M. YOUNG Scholars Program®.  A pre-concert reception with hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar will begin at 5:30 p.m. The program and concert, which features the Ansyn Banks Quintet performing a tribute to jazz great Kenny Dorham, begins at 7:00 p.m.

As a jazz trumpeter, singer and composer, Kenny Dorham played with such jazz greats as Dizzy Gillespie, Lionel Hampton, Billy Eckstine and Mercer Ellington. He was best known for his album entitled Afro-Cuban which showcased his interest in combining Latin music with jazz.

Ansyn Banks, an associate professor of jazz trumpet at the University of Louisville School of Music, teaches jazz styles and analysis, jazz improvisation and directs the university’s jazz combo program.  He has performed with jazz legends such as Dick Oatts, Harry Pickens, Chuck Marohnic, Hank Marr, Gene Walker and Melvin Rhyne as well as some of the biggest names in entertainment like the Mighty Dells, The Temptations, Aretha Franklin and the Four Tops.

Prior to the concert, Lincoln Foundation will present the prestigious Spirit of Excellence Award which is annually given to a local individual who exemplifies an active commitment to education, human/community service, and leadership.  This year’s recipient is Cathe Dykstra, Chief Possibility Officer and President & CEO of Family Scholar House, for her role in “changing lives, families and communities through education”.  Past recipients include Christina Lee Brown, Laura Douglas, Ed Hamilton, Mary Gwen Wheeler, Mayor Greg Fischer, Robert & Deborah Blair and Lonnie & the late Muhammad Ali.

Lincoln Foundation has empowered disadvantaged youth to overcome adversity through education since its inception by Berea College over 100 years ago. Lincoln Foundation believes that students can break the cycle of poverty in their families through higher education. The mission of the organization is to provide educational enrichment programs that develop and support youth in overcoming barriers to achievement.  The signature Whitney M. YOUNG Scholars Program® annually serves approximately 460 students in grades 7-12 and over a six-year period prepares them for high school and college graduation. The college-prep program has demonstrated successful outcomes with Scholars earning over 361 undergraduate and graduate degrees since 2000.  Today over 150 Scholars are enrolled at accredited colleges or universities.

The Evening of Jazz is made possible this year due to the generous support of LG&E and KU Energy, Brown-Forman, Business First, Louisville Defender, Stock Yards Bank & Trust and PNC Bank among others.

Tickets are available for purchase through the KCD Theater box office http://www.kcdtheater.org.  For additional information about Lincoln Foundation or the 22nd Annual Evening of Jazz, please contact Paula Campbell at 502.585.4733 ext. 203 or visit the Lincoln Foundation website at http://www.lincolnfdn.org.

To schedule an interview and/or have one of our artists perform during your television program, please contact Sherlene Shanklin at sshanklin@vippcommunications.com. 

Link to Evening of Jazz flyer-  EOJ17Postcard-final

 

 

 

 

The VIPP Report: Darnell “SuperChef” Ferguson host first book signing on one year anniversary of his new restaurant

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ENTREPRENEUR & TELEVISION PERSONALITY ADDS AUTHOR TO HIS TITLE WITH THE RELEASE OF HIS NEW BOOK “KNOWING IS HALF THE FIGHT…COOKING IS THE OTHER.”

(Louisville, KY) Have you even seen the Louisville entrepreneur and owner of one of the most notable restaurants in Louisville do anything on a small scale?  Your answer is likely “no” because he does everything in a big way or should we say “supersized”?  Darnell “Super Chef” Ferguson releases his new book on the one year anniversary of the opening of his restaurant Super Chefs. On Saturday, July 15th, Darnell and his Super Chef team will celebrate overcoming obstacles from fire to flood but their faith is what got them to see this day.

At 11:00 am Darnell will host a book launch & signing session of his book entitled “Knowing is half the fight…Cooking is the other”.  This was the brainchild of “Super Chef” when he was in culinary school.  Fast-forward several years later with a successful business and frequent appearances on several national cooking shows this was the perfect time to finish the project.

Ferguson says “When you read my book, it will give you healthy cooking tips, smart serving sizes to assist with portion control and mental food tips.  When customers come into my restaurant they always stop me and ask general questions about food, preparation and dieting so I put many of the answers in the book.  Knowing is half the fight. I hope when you read it that you will have several “I didn’t know that moments.”

We invite you to come taste great food including free appetizers and pick up an autographed copy of the book for $20.00. Breakfast and lunch is served 8:00 am to 3:00 pm Tuesday-Sunday and Dinner is from 5:00 pm to 10:00pm Thursday-Saturday.  Super Chefs located at 1702 Bardstown Road with street parking and convenient parking in the back of the restaurant for customers.

You can also purchase “Knowing is half the fight…Cooking is the other” online at http://eatsuperchefs.com/ and/or www.iamsuperchef.com.

If you would like to setup an interview with Darnell “Super Chef” Ferguson, please contact VIPP Communications at 502-295-0435 or by email at info@vippcommunications.com.

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VIPP Communications is your one-stop PR/Marketing/Production/Event Management firm that works with business leaders, professional athletes and entertainers.  With over 25 years experience in the field, our work speaks for itself.  To have one of our V.I.P. consultants assist you with your next project, contact us at info at vippcommunications dot com.

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The VIPP Report: Arts Council of Louisville will celebrate Women’s History Month

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Sherlene Shanklin with WHAS11 Television and the owner of VIPP Communications (The VIPP Report, VIPP Style and Ivy Promotions) will be one of the guest speakers.

You are cordially invited the HISTORIC program celebrating Women’s History Month. Workshops of great interest and issues with local leaders discussing “Where do we go from here?” The topics are: JOBS; SOCIAL JUSTICE; ARTS EDUCATION; YOUTH LEADERSHIP; BUSINESS & ENTREPRENEURSHIP; BANKING & FINANCE; MEDIA; HEALTHY & WELLNESS.

KICKING OFF this exciting day of activities are arts presentations of “A Bus Ride with Mrs. Rosa Parks” and performers from Belize Dance Intermix.

At noon, there’s A MEMORIAL TRIBUTE TO THE LEGACY OF LOUISVILLE BLACK WOMEN & LUNCHEON opens with a traditional African Drum Call and dance with Harlina Churn Diallo. A tradition African Ceremony is done by as a Libation by Nana Akosua Bakeman Gyeaboa, LCSW, LCAD, CCTP, CNHP, ND in the Hotel Ballroom. Arts presented during the meal are “I AM ANGELA DAVIS” by Ayana Churn and a MIME by “Sunni.”

The distinguished Professor Dr. Joy Carew, Ph.D. of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville will be the keynote speaker.

RECOGNITION OF BLACK WOMEN: Ruth Bryant; Sarah Martin; Abby Fife; Mary Ann Fisher; Representative Mae-Street-Kidd; Harriett Porter; Dani Porter; Delores Baker; Anita Neil; Alderwoman Louise Reynolds; Zambia Nkrumah White; Alderwoman Lois Morris; Mary Alyce Sweeney; Senator Georgia Montgomery Davis Powers; Maude Brown Porter; Mildred Neal; Samiyra Shabazz; Judith E. Green; Juanita Burks; Dollye Cunningham; Zephra Mae Miller; Attorney Alberta Jones; Barbara Miller; Geneva Cooper Rich; Wilma Claybourne; Hilda Butler; Zephra Mae Miller; Mattie Coffield; Jewel K. McNari; Lucy Gantt Sheppard; Gladys Carter; Emma L. Minnis, Ida Louise King; Jimmy White; Milton Page; Lillian Cole-Singleton, Margaret Yeager, Lucille Madry; Anna L. Huddleston; Effie Mae Jewell, Georgia Eugene; Maude Benboe; Vera Dockery; Eleanor Hutchinson; Rebecca Shashu Tucker; Lillian D. Anthony; Grace James; Amy Hamilton; Rose Banks and to all our divine and benevolent African Ancestors who gave us the best of themselves. (A partial listing).

CLOSING PANEL DISCUSSION ~ Q & A with the community.

TOPIC -“WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?”
*ELECTED METRO LOUISVILLE COUNCILWOMEN & JCPS- Ms. Jessica Green; Dr. Barbara Shanklin; Ms. Mary Woolridge and Ms. Cheri Bryant Hamilton & Elected Jefferson County Public School Board Member Ms. Diane Porter.

ADJOURNMENT AFFIRMATION

MAKING MOVES: THE POWER OF BLACK WOMEN
EVENT DATE: Saturday = March ;18, 2017 – Open to the public
Place: Hotel Louisville,120 West Broadway, Louisville, KY 40202
Time: 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Doors open at 8:30 AM
Contact: Nana Yaa Asantewaa (502) 567-2787
Email: louisvillearts@aol.com
Presented by Arts Council of Louisville, Inc. – Disability Accessible

TICKETS – ONLINE – www.Eventbrite.com <community>
and can be purchased at BETTER DAYS WEST REC0RDS,
LYLES MALL 26TH & BROADWAY

The VIPP Report: Staged reading about a father’s grief over senseless violence and the murder of his young daughter

 

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FOLLOWED BY DISCUSSION WHO WORK CLOSELY WITH VICTIMS AND THEIR FAMILIES

(Louisville, KY) The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, (KCAAH) in collaboration with the University of Louisville Theatre Program and the Black Media Collaborative, (BMC) presents Zooman and the Sign.

The GRIOT Theatre Series will also hold a community conversation immediately following the reading.  It will take place on Friday, December 9th at 7:00 p.m. at the KCAAH, 1701 West Muhammad Ali Blvd.

Zooman and the Sign is based on a teen in Philadelphia who literally terrorized his community.  The play focuses on Zooman’s senseless murder of a 12-year old African American girl in front of her house with a street filled with witnesses all whom are afraid to talk.  The grieving father posted a sign accusing the entire community of cowardice in the face of the ever escalating violence and the family’s attempts for justice.

The play was written over three decades ago but unfortunately many communities across the United States still face the “Zooman” mentality.

In an attempt to facilitate a community conversation about violence the persists in our community there will be a conversation where Dr. Eddie Wood of the LIFE Hope Center Inc. and Rashaad Abdur-Rahman of the Office for Safe and Healthy Neighborhoods will moderate a panel discussion after the reading of Zooman and the Sign.

For additional information on how you can be a part of the Black Media Collaborative, please call 502-583-4100.

The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage is located at 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd, Louisville, KY 40203. Follow KCAAH on Twitter @kygriot for events and announcements.

Media Inquiries: To setup an interview (via phone or in-person) please contact VIPP Communications at info@vippcommuncations.com.

If you would like to advertise with The VIPP Report please contact us at thevippreport@vippcommunications.com.  You can follow us on Twitter @thevippreport @vippcomm.  

VIPP Communications is your one-stop public relations, marketing, branding, image consultant and crisis management firm.  We represent everyone from professional athletes, entertainers, small businesses, non-profit organizations to corporate leaders.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The VIPP Report: A lecture series named in honor of a Louisville civil rights leader welcomes Angela Davis

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Special from Sherlene Shanklin, WHAS11 Television, ABC affiliate Louisville  

The person who said “We have to talk about liberating minds as well as liberating society” will be a part of the 10th annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture Series at the University of Louisville .  Angela Davis, one of the nation’s leading advocates for prison reform and abolition, gender equity, and racial and economic justice will be their guest.  The social justice activist’s topic will be “Freedom is a Constant Struggle”.

The free event will be held on Tuesday, November 15th in the Brown &  Williamson Club at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium on Floyd Street.  All seating is first come, first served basis for the 6:00 p.m. talk.

Davis is an accomplished author and lecturer with engagements all over the United States, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and South America.  She’s published eight books including an anthology of her writings and speeches: “Freedom is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine and the Foundations of a Movement.”

Following the talk, there will be a book signing.

This educator and a vocal activist in the Civil Rights Movement draws upon her own experiences in the early seventies as a person who spent eighteen months in jail and on trial, after being placed on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted List.

You may remember that Davis was a visiting professor with the University of Louisville in 2002.  She taught women’s and gender studies course.

Davis, a longtime friend of the late Anne and Carl Braden, wrote the foreword to the biography “Subversive Southerner: Anne Braden and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Cold War South,” written by institute director and UofL professor Cate Fosl.

This lecture series and institute are named for the Bradens who were active in the civil rights movement in Louisville

To learn more about the 10th annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture Series go to www.louisville.edu/braden.

You can also follow me on Twitter @Sherlenemediapr and Instagram @Sherlenemediapro.

TheVIPPReport@vippcommunications.com Twitter @VIPPComm @Thevippreport

The VIPP Report: Summer Olympics maybe over for the athletes but the eLearn Olympic scholars prepare for medal ceremony and celebration

 

elearn-LOGO-REVISEDLouisville Central Community Centers (LCCC) will host their Summer eLearn Olympics celebration at 11am on Saturday, September 24, 2016 to recognize nearly 80 medalists and their supporters. Our scholars will be presented with gold, silver or bronze medals and other prizes for their achievements using Study Island, a technology-based system that supports the local school district’s Every 1 Learns initiative. Schools and community organizations who support student achievement will also be recognized. Currently, there’s 1,300 participants in the eLearn Olympics program.

eLearn Olympics was created in 2013 by LCCC as an initiative to celebrate academic achievements of students grades K-12. LCCC’s President, Kevin Fields says “It’s exciting that at this of year everyone is in the Olympic spirit. We cheered on all of the Team USA but we kept a close eye on 2-time Olympic Gold Medalist Angel McCoughtry. The former University of Louisville star and WNBA all-star is a great supporter of the program and visits our youth when she’s in Louisville to motivate the eLearn Olympic team.”

In eLearn Olympics, students win prizes and gain public distinction for completing online, skill-building lessons in Study Island. This program is geared toward helping students achieve proficiency in their common-core academic skill areas that are part of Kentucky Department of Education curriculum standards. eLearn Olympics offers annual recognition for participation and achievement in extracurricular academic programs.

A complete list of our event’s honorees is attached. JCPS Diversity Coordinator Delquan Dorsey, JCPS Board Member Diane Porter, Gheens Foundation CEO Barry Allen and representatives of the Angel McCoughtry Dream Foundation will join LCCC in honoring these students and their families. The public is invited to attend the celebration on Saturday, September 24, from 11:00-12:00 am at Old Walnut Street, 1300 W Muhammad Ali Blvd (40203), in the Atrium Room.

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About Louisville Central Community Centers

LCCC is headquartered in Louisville, KY, at 13th Street and West Muhammad Ali Boulevard, in the Russell neighborhood. LCCC is a 501c(3), private, non-profit community-based organization that is governed by an independent, volunteer Board of Directors. LCCC offers a variety of programs and services in support of children and families. Early childhood education, youth development, arts education and other after school programs, employment services and job training for adults, money management and home ownership are just some of the services provided. Sam Watkins, Jr. is the president and CEO of LCCC.

About eLearn Olympics

Founded by LCCC with support from the Gheens Foundation, JCPS and other sponsors, eLearn Olympics is a set of academic competition events that incentivize and reward student achievement in areas of reading, mathematics, science & social studies. Now with over 1400 enrolled members, eLearn Olympic sparks a spirit of pride among students, parents, schools and community-based learning places by providing opportunities for educational competition, academic skill development and public recognition. Students can earn public distinction as gold, silver or bronze medalists in a variety of academic performance categories. For more information visit http://www.elearnolympics.com or call (502) 583-8821.

Watkins poses with Olympian Medalist

 

 

 

The VIPP Report: Miss Kentucky’s Outstanding Teen Scholarship Pageant Finds A New Home

MissKentuckyTeenPageantLouisville is the new site for a prominent pageant that showcases the talents of area teens 

(Louisville KY) On Saturday, June 25th at 8:00 pm one young lady will walk across the stage to receive her crown in the 2016 Miss Kentucky’s Outstanding Teen Scholarship Pageant.  Teens from all over the Bluegrass will travel to Louisville to compete for cash scholarships and an assortment of other prizes.

Twenty-three young ladies between the ages of 13 to 17 will be at the Kentucky Center for the Arts located in downtown Louisville from June 24th-25th.  Each contestant will go through two preliminary phases of competition.  Then on Saturday night, the Top 11 scorers will participate in the final competition where one will be crowned Miss Kentucky’s Outstanding Teen.

Each contestant will be judged on talent, a private interview, lifestyle and fitness in sportswear, evening wear and on-stage question.  The winner on June 25th will represent Kentucky at the Miss America’s Outstanding Teen Scholarship Pageant in Orlando, Florida from August 2-6th.

Ashley Miller, Executive Director for the teen pageant and Vice President of the Miss Kentucky board says “This system is a great opportunity for the teens of Kentucky to showcase their talents and win scholarships that can assist them in paying for college. The Miss America organization is about empowering young women with the skills they need to be successful leaders both in their careers and in their communities.  It is largely because of the skills I learned during my time competing in this system that I have been so successful in my career and community.”

If you would like to come out and support the Miss Kentucky’s Outstanding Teen Pageant, tickets start at $30.  You can purchase them at the Kentucky Center Box Office.

If you would like to be a sponsor and/or donate gift bags please, contact Ashley Miller at MissKYOTeen@gmail.com.  To set up an interview, please call Sherlene Shanklin, at sshanklin@vippcommunications.com or 502-582-7716.

For additional information on the pageant please visit www.misskentuckypageant.com.

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 The Miss Kentucky’s Outstanding Teen Pageant is an official preliminary of the Miss America’s Outstanding Teen Scholarship Organization.  This program is empowering young women through pageantry to develop leadership skills, confidence and achieve their biggest goals in life. MKYOT is changing Kentucky, one young woman at a time!

The VIPP Report: Students receive medals and prizes for the participation in eLearn Olympics

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Louisville, Kentucky (May 13, 2016)—Louisville Central Community Centers (LCCC) will host their Spring eLearn Olympics celebration at 11am on Saturday, May 14, 2016 to recognize nearly 80 medalists and their supporters. Students will be presented with gold, silver or bronze medals and other prizes for their achievements using Study Island, a technology-based system that supports the local school district’s Every 1 Learns initiative. Schools and community organizations who support student achievement will also be recognized. Currently, there’s 1,400 participants in the eLearn Olympics program.

eLearn Olympics was created in 2013 by LCCC as an initiative to celebrate academic achievements of students grades K-12. LCCC’s Senior Vice President, Kevin Fields, says as we approach the 2016 Olympics in Reno we want to motivate our youth not only in athletics but in academics. As we cheer on Olympian Angel McCoughtry who is a great supporter of our initiative we want to motivate our scholars to achieve at their ultimate potential and to use Study Island throughout their summer break.”

In eLearn Olympics, students win prizes and gain public distinction for completing online, skill-building lessons in Study Island. This program is geared toward helping students achieve proficiency in their common-core academic skill areas that are part of Kentucky Department of Education curriculum standards. eLearn Olympics offers annual recognition for participation and achievement in extracurricular academic programs.

You can see a complete list of our event’s honorees below. JCPS Director of Volunteer Talent Center Dr. Allene Gold, JCPS Board Member Diane Porter, Gheens Foundation CEO Barry Allen and representatives of the Angel McCoughtry Dream Foundation will join LCCC in honoring these students and their families. The public is invited to attend the celebration on May 14, from 11:00-12:00 am at Old Walnut Street, 1300 W Muhammad Ali Blvd (40203), in the Atrium Room.

We will also recognize the top three schools that had the most medalists during the Spring competition.   Price Elementary with 11 medalists, Western Middle School with 10 medalists and there’s a four-way tie with Johnson Traditional, Myers Middle, Meyzeek Middle and Newburg Middle Schools all having five medalists.

There will be three community centers acknowledged during the program. That’s Lighthouse Promise with 20 Spring medalists, Big Brothers Big Sisters with four medalists and Louisville Central Community Centers with a total of three medalists.

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About Louisville Central Community Centers

LCCC is headquartered in Louisville, KY, at 13th Street and West Muhammad Ali Boulevard, in the Russell neighborhood. LCCC is a 501c(3), private, non-profit community-based organization that is governed by an independent, volunteer Board of Directors. LCCC offers a variety of programs and services in support of children and families. Early childhood education, youth development, arts education and other after school programs, employment services and job training for adults, money management and home ownership are just some of the services provided. Sam Watkins, Jr. is the president and CEO of LCCC.

About eLearn Olympics

Founded by LCCC with support from the Gheens Foundation, JCPS and other sponsors, eLearn Olympics is a set of academic competition events that incentivize and reward student achievement in areas of reading, mathematics, science & social studies. Now with over 1400 enrolled members, eLearn Olympic sparks a spirit of pride among students, parents, schools and community-based learning places by providing opportunities for educational competition, academic skill development and public recognition. Students can earn public distinction as gold, silver or bronze medalists in a variety of academic performance categories. For more information visit http://www.elearnolympics.com or call (502) 583-8821.

If you have a story idea, send it to TheVIPPReport@vippcommunications.com.  You can follow us one Twitter @thevippreport @vippcomm.  #thevippreport #vippcommunications

Watkins poses with Olympian Medalist

Reading medalists

Gold medalists

Ashton Tunstull (Eisenhower Elementary)

Asia Tunstull (Eisenhower Elementary)

Treasure Wales (Johnson Traditional Middle)

Ezell Everett (Johnson Traditional Middle)

Marcus Griffin (Johnson Traditional Middle)

Silver medalists

LaMichael Arnold (King Elementary)

Jaelyn Pruitt (Crums Lane Elementary)

Gabrielle McDonald (Price Elementary)

Stephan Smith (Crums Lane Elementary)

Jacobi Jones (Crums Lane Elementary)

Perrion Hughes (Wheatley Elementary)

Jose Ortiz (Myers Middle)

Gavin Sams (Meyzeek Middle)

Bronze medalists

Ariyauna Ridgeway (Western Middle)

Ndeye Cisse (Noe Middle)

Warren King (Meyzeek Middle)

Hawa Simagan (Price Elementary)

Ameena Shareef (King Elementary)

Hugo Ramosleon (Myers Middle)

Tyquan Starks (Western Middle)

Deasia Dennis (Carter Elementary)

Philippine Simagan (Price Elementary)

Elean Meridaperez (Myers Middle)

Thomas Bryant (Myers Middle)

Andrea Trejo (Myers Middle)

Detrick Dyer (Meyzeek Middle)

Malachi Tilford (Meyzeek Middle)

Joseph Noah (Western Middle)

Ciara Higgins (Auburndale Elementary)

Joseph Foster (Noe Middle)

Skyla Todd (Price Elementary)

Mackayla Andrews (Noe Middle)

Ameera Delouvpre (Farmer Elementary)

Daquan Williams (Western Middle)

Joyceonna Grant (Newburg Middle)

Khia Briscoe (Crosby Middle)

Jaalyne Everett (Western Middle)

Kieron McMurry (Moore Traditional)

 

Math medalists

Gold medalists

Natalya Pitts (Price Elementary)

Ameera Delouvpre (Farmer Elementary)

Jayla Miles (Young Elementary)

Silver medalists

Seannae Williams (Field Elementary)

Breanna Carson (Western Middle)

Chloe Cary (Price Elementary)

Dominiquic Martin (Newburg Middle)

Donnavon Grant (Luhr Elementary)

Philippine Simagan (Price Elementary)

Elijah Todd (Newburg Middle)

Jayla Todd (Price Elementary)

Ibrahim Delouvpre (Newburg Middle)

Bronze medalists

Jayden   Harris (Wilkerson Elementary)

Jayden   Todd (Price Elementary)

Amari    Smith (Newburg Middle)

Treasure Murray (Western Middle)

Jordyn Pennebaker (Johnson Traditional)

Alexis Bryant (Western Middle)

Ashton Tunstull (Eisenhower Elementary)

MaKiya  West (Price Elementary)

Asia Tunstull (Eisenhower Elementary)

Derica Johnson (Johnson Traditional)

Ryane Holmes (Chancey Elementary)

Zechariah Mimms (Hartstern Elementary)

Aniya Lawhorn (Conway Middle)

Alisia Crawford (Robert Frost Six Grade Academy)

Brooklyn Guy (Western Middle)

Davione Campbell (Sanders Elementary)

Kaleah Sheffield (Meyzeek Middle)

Kieron McMurry (Moore Traditional)

Timari Young (Western Middle)

Fanta Simagan (Price Elementary)

 

 

The VIPP Report: eLearn Olympics will award over 100 JCPS students for staying on the right track during their summer vacation

Watkins poses with Olympian Medalist

It’s that time again to see how Louisville youth did over their summer vacation with one of the most inspiring and motivating scholastic driven programs in Jefferson County.  Louisville Central Community Centers, (LCCC) will recognize the achievement 115 youth and their supporters at the eLearn Olympics celebration.  The program will on Monday, August 10th at 10 am.  Students will be presented with gold, silver or bronze medals and other prizes for their achievements using Study Island, a technology-based system that supports the local school district’s Every 1 Learns initiative. Schools and community organizations who support student achievement will also be recognized.

eLearn Olympics was created in 2013 by LCCC as an initiative to celebrate academic achievements of students grades K-12.

In eLearn Olympics, students win prizes and gain public distinction for completing online, skill-building lessons in Study Island. This program is geared toward helping students achieve proficiency in the common-core academic skill areas that are part of Kentucky Department of Education curriculum standards. eLearn Olympics offers annual recognition for participation and achievement in extracurricular academic programs.

JCPS Superintendent Donna Hargens, JCPS Board Member Diane Porter, Gheens Foundation CEO Barry Allen, and representatives of the Angel McCoughtry Dream Foundation will join LCCC in honoring these students and their families. The public is invited to attend the celebration on August 10, from 10:00-11:30 am at Old Walnut Street, 1300 W Muhammad Ali Blvd (40203), in the Atrium Room.

If you have a story idea, send it to TheVIPPReport@vippcommunications.com.  You can follow us on Twitter @VIPPComm.

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