The VIPP Report: One of the world’s top African American sculptors is honored by his hometown

Ed Hamilton named Louisvillian of the Year

(Louisville, KY) You’ve seen his works from The Amistad, Muhammad Ali’s steel boxing gloves both in Louisville, The African American Civil War Memorial, ‘Spirit of Freedom’ in Washington to the Unfinished March of the late Dr. Martin Luther King in Newport News.  Now, the American Advertising Federation of Louisville announces that Ed Hamilton will receive the “Louisvillian of the Year” award. 

Hamilton is receiving the award for his outstanding achievement and generous personal contributions in the areas of civic, educational and business.  The sculptor only needed to possess only one of the three, but this talented humanitarian is a true community ambassador who works tirelessly who in turn is an inspiration to so many within Louisville and communities around the U.S. The national acclaimed sculptor gives his time and talents.

Ed Hamilton says “As a citizen of Louisville, KY, I’m proud and honored to have been chosen as the recipient of the 2020 Louisvillian of the Year award.  I know I owe my success to many who saw my talent during the early years of my artistic journey.

It is in the spirit of family, parents that adopted me and are now deceased, Edward Norton and Amy Jane Camp Hamilton.   They raised me to have respect for all people, the value of hard work and development of moral values.  This enabled me to extend myself into the Louisville community. 

To the love of my life and soul mate of 54 years of marriage, Bernadette, I seriously believe if not for her love and support, I would not be the man, the father, or the artist that I am today.  How lucky I am to be alive today.

I extend blessings to all past recipients and indeed I’m in good company.”

Other works Hamilton has designed is the 16th President of the United States and Kentucky native Abraham Lincoln with the Lincoln Memorial which is located along the Ohio River in downtown Louisville. He’s known for but not limited to is The Booker T. Washington Memorial in Hampton, VA, Joe Louis Memorial in Detroit, MI, and the Amistad Memorial in New Haven, CT just to name a few of the many works you can visit around the U.S. 

To learn more about Ed Hamilton and his works contact, Sherlene Shanklin with VIPP Communications for appearance and speaking engagement availability at sshanklin@vippcommunications.com.

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VIPP Communications is a full service public relations, event management and production firm headquartered in Louisville, KY with clients and/or projects all over the U.S. We can create, maintain and sustain your brand.  Our clientele range from small businesses, non-profits, corporate leaders, entertainment to current and retired professional athletes.  Contact one of our team members to see if we can assist you at info at vippcommunications dot com.  www.vippcommunications.com

The VIPP Report: The first African American secretary for the Smithsonian visits KCAAH in Louisville

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By Sherlene M. Shanklin

On September 25th at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage they hosted An Extraordinary Evening with Dr. Lonnie Bunch.

Dr. Bunch is the 14th Secretary of the Smithsonian Institute.  That consists of 19 museums, nine research centers and the National Zoo.  He was previously the founding director of the National Museum of African American History.

The Heritage Center is located a 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Boulevard in Louisville, Ky.

See link for my WHAS11.com photo gallery Dr. Lonnie Bunch in Louisville, Ky

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The VIPP Report: Trayvon Martin’s mother will speak in Louisville for their Black Family Conference

Conference named in honor of Dr. Joseph McMillan

The Dr. Joseph McMillan National Conference on the Black Family in America

By Sherlene Shanklin

February marks African American History Month. It’s a time to recognize those who worked tirelessly to break barriers when it was unacceptable and not well received to advance to achieve.

The Dr. Joseph McMillan National Conference on the Black Family in America will convene in Louisville on Feb. 23 and Feb. 24 to celebrate the achievements and to acknowledge, discuss and to put words into action that there are still disparities that people of color still need to overcome.

The conference will be held at the Louisville Central Community Center, (LCCC). This year’s theme, “Elevating the Health and Safety of the Black Family and Community”.  The mother of Trayvon Martin, Sybrina Fulton will be the keynote speaker for the brunch.  Trayvon’s case sparked national conversation and protests with the concerns of racism, gun violence, stereotyping to profiling.

In February of 2012, 17-year-old Trayvon was walking back from a convenience store in Sanford, Florida after purchasing candy and something to drink.  He encountered George Zimmerman.  He said that he killed the teen in self-defense after a scuffle. Zimmerman saw Martin in the neighborhood and did not recognize him so he called police.

According to Zimmerman, the neighborhood had several robberies and he thought Martin was a suspect.  After, contacting police he got into an altercation with the teen and shot Trayvon in the chest.

Initially, Zimmerman was not charged because police said there was no evidence but due to the national media coverage Zimmerman was charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter but later acquitted by a jury in 2013.

Trayvon Martin would have been 23 years old today, (Feb. 5th).

For additional information on the Dr. Joseph McMillan National Conference on the Black Family in America call 502-852-6656 or by email at efc@louisville.edu.  Also, here’s a link to their Eventbrite page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/45th-dr-mcmillan-national-conference-on-the-black-family-in-america-tickets-39782139450.

Promo video for the conference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_j8EjXC2Aw&app=desktop

If you have a story idea, send it to thevippreport@vippcommunications.com.  Follow us on Twitter @thevippreport @vippcomm.

 

 

The VIPP Report: Remembering Muhammad Ali

MUHAMMAD ALI’S FUNERAL PROCESSIONAL

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COMES BY THE KENTUCKY CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE

(Louisville, KY) On June 3rd, Louisville native Muhammad Ali died at the age of 74 years of age in Phoenix, Arizona.  The Greatest of All Time, (GOAT) had a champion’s sendoff in his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky.  On Friday, June 10th, streets throughout the city were blocked off so his 17-car processional could take his final journey to his resting place at Cave Hill Cemetery.

The processional led by family owned A.D. Porter and Sons Funeral Home owned by African-Americans has served the community for more than 100 years.  They traveled down Old Walnut Street, known today as Muhammad Ali Blvd one last time.  Stopping by landmarks and things important to Ali and his family.

When they passed 17th and Muhammad Ali they approached the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage where Aukram Burton, Executive Director for KCAAH captured these breath-taking and historical photos as hundreds stood at that route to say goodbye to Ali.

We invite you to use the photo with the courtesy of Aukram Burton, KCAAH.  If you use the photos, please let us know so we can share with others.

For additional information about the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage by calling 502-583-4100.

To do a story and/or obtain quotes from member of the KCAAH executive staff, please contact Sherlene Shanklin, VIPP Communications at info@vippcommuncations.com.

TheVIPPReport@vippcommunications.com Follow us on Twitter @thevippreport @vippcomm.

About KCAAH

The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage is the result of a collection of African American educators, artists and historians who have collaborated to give the long dormant history of African Americans in the region the voice and platform it deserves. This group evolved from the Louisville and Jefferson County African American Heritage Committee into its current mold, with a single unifying goal of promoting the Kentuckiana region’s black heritage.

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The VIPP Report: Prince had a giving heart for a historic Louisville library

Prince Check

Special Report by Sherlene Shanklin, WHAS11 Television/ABC

I saw several people on my social media pages talking about Prince Rogers Nelson donating money to a Louisville library.  I have spoken with the spokesman with the Louisville Public Library and they confirm that Prince’s charity “Love 4 One Another Charities” donated $12,000 to the Louisville Free Public Library.  It was earmarked for the Western Branch Library.   In 1905, the Western Colored Library opened at 1125 West Chestnut Street, the first free public library in the nation for African-Americans staffed entirely by African-Americans. On October 28, 1908, the newly constructed Carnegie Library opened at its current location. The branch was led by pioneering African-American librarian, Reverend Thomas F. Blue.

I have obtained the check that Prince sent to the charity.

If you have a story idea send it to The411@whas11.com.  You can follow me on Twitter at @Sherlenemediapr and Instagram @Sherlenemediapro for real-time news.

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(Exclusive Coverage) Prince performs onstage during the “HitnRun” tour opener at The Louisville Palace on March 14, 2015 in Louisville, Kentucky.